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THE STAND COMIC BOOK

Tuesday, June 25, 2019


The Stand, published from to , was a series of comic books by Marvel Comics based on Stephen King's novel of the same name. Based on the Stephen King's The Stand Vol. The Stand: Captain Trips (Issues) (5 Book Series) and millions of other books are Ships from and sold by Larry's Comics, Inc. The Stand is a classic tale of good vs. evil, loss weighed against redemption and and comic-book writer best known for his work for Marvel Comics and for the.


The Stand Comic Book

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Written by ROBERTO AGUIRRE-SACASA. Art by MIKE PERKINS. 32 pages, full color. The item for sale here is a1st print The Stand #5 comic book. This book i. The Stand: Captain Trips () 5 issues The Stand: American Nightmares () 5 issues The Stand: Soul Survivors () 5 issues The. Exclusive hardcover edition, collects The Stand: Captain Trips series of Clearly I am not going into enough comic-book storesm because I haven't seen this?.

But I think I need a bit more discipline before tackling it; so it's been shoved to the back burner, and there it will sit for what will probably end up being several more years. However, I figured that while I was still in the vicinity of the novel having reread it earlier this summer , it would make sense to go ahead and plow through the retrospectives on the miniseries and the comics.

The Stand Comic Books

I did the posts on the miniseries a few weeks ago: they can be found here , here , here , here , and, sort of, here. And so, here we are, launching the reviews of the comic-book adaption. I've been looking forward to doing these; I read the series issue-by-issue when it came out, and occasionally found myself extremely frustrated by the pace, which I thought didn't work well on a month-by-month basis.

As a result, my enthusiasm for the series was extremely muted, and when it concluded I felt more or less indifferent to the whole thing. But by that time, I had launched this blog the first version of it, at least , and I knew that at some point in time, I'd sit down and reread the entire series. I wondered if the compressed time-span would make a difference. The answer to that question is yes.

I still have problems with some of it almost entirely focused on certain aspects of the art , but overall, I found it to be a very enjoyable piece of work. It hangs together quite well, both as an adaptation of the novel and as a series of comics.

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And frankly, the fact that Marvel was able to finish the series using the same writer, artist, and color artist on every single issue is amazing. Compare this to the fact that this year, over at Vertigo, editorial was unable to keep a creative team together for a mere seven issues of their Django Unchained adaptation. They made some horrendous decisions in terms of who to bring in a fill-in artists, and it for my money ruined that adaptation.

Even if I didn't like the adaptation, I'd be impressed and gratified by the consistency. I thought that was well worth praising a bit right here at the outset, in case I forget to mention it later and end up taking it for granted. It definitely should not be taken for granted. So, let's dive in and start the dissection.

The format is going to be like this: one post for each of the six collections or graphic novels, if you prefer , plus one concluding post for the Omnibus edition. Within each post, I'm going to cover the issues that are collected in that particular edition, complete with cover galleries and synopses; I think I'll give you a complete rundown of what the issues contained on a page-by-page basis. That strikes me as being a valuable reference tool. Giving the basics as a point of reference seems okay-ish to me, though.

Either way, after summarizing each issue I'll turn to the graphic novel itself and we'll just see what happens. I'll think my thinks and tell you about them, and where we go is wherever we go. Sound good? Well, then, let's hit the road; Vegas is a-waitin' And while I like the middle image of Flagg, I don't really know what the two on either side are trying to communicate.

Speaking of the perils of communication, what do we think about Captain Trips as a title for Vol. Personally, I'm not a fan of that, either. Then again, I'm not a fan of "Captain Trips" being used as a moniker for the superflu; so maybe I'm just biased, but I can't quite grasp why anyone in-story would call the superflu by that name. If I understand the nickname correctly, "Captain Trips" is a designation you give to someone who is really, really high, possibly on a regular basis.

Issues in this Collection

I mean, drooling-on-themselves, unresponsive, semi-catatonic high. Jerry Garcia of the Grateful Dead was either an origin point for this, or was so commonly in that state of affairs that he was given the nickname and it stuck. Dude has a biography titled after it. I'm tempted to download a used copy, just to see if it sheds any light on this issue.

I don't see any Garcia connection; maybe there's some sort of a Grateful Dead pun that I'm missing out on. But it seems more likely that the idea has to be that the superflu has knocked people on their ass the way a super-duper jolt of LSD might do. Except for all the snot and the tube-neck and whatnot. I don't know; it doesn't quite make sense to me. As such, I think that this title is a little counter-productive. Scripter Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa does not make the concept clear.

How could he? Stephen King -- probably assuming that people in would get the reference -- didn't make the concept clear, either.

At least not for me.

And my guess is that a lot of people are confused by it. Some of them may not even know they're confused; they may not get that it's a reference, they may just think it's some weird nickname for the flu, and that that is its only significance.

Stephen King The Stand Comics

Either way, I assume Jerry Garcia fans resent the connection; harshes their mellow, even. So for me, a different title for this first arc of the comic would have preferable. Project Blue, maybe? Rough Beasts? Things Fall Apart? The Plague? The Fall? That last one would have a certain symmetry with "The Stand. I dunno. I think I might vote for Project Blue. Don't get me wrong; Captain Trips as a title doesn't bother me all that much. It bothers me just enough that I wanted to mention it, though, and that being concluded, let's move on, and take a look at the contents of the individual issues.

The Stand Sketchbook published July 2, Not technically a part of Captain Trips, I figured this comic was nevertheless worth covering briefly. It was a promotional tool that comic-book shops used as a giveaway, in the hopes of getting customers interested in downloading the actual series when it hit shelves a couple of months later. There's nothing here that could be considered essential. It was basically a sneak-peek at what the book was going to look like. For fans, though, it's worth checking out.

There are lots of sketches some color, most black and white , including character sketches with quotes from members of the creative team. Here's a badass promo image of Flagg that was used as a cover for the second printing of Captain Trips 1: art by Mike Perkins and Laura Martin For those of you who are intrigued by this, don't feel as if you need to track down a copy of the sketchbook itself; all seventeen pages of it appear at the back of the Captain Trips graphic novel.

Or, at least, they do in the hardback copy I own; I assume the paperback editions include it, as well, but I can't say for sure. The Stand: Captain Trips 1 published September 10, cover date December regular cover, art by Lee Bermejo and Laura Martin variant cover, art by Mike Perkins and Laura Martin sketch variant cover, art by Mike Perkins The covers for this premiere issue are a bit of a mixed bag for me. I like the Lee Bermejo one; his take on Flagg is menacing and powerful. I'm less enthralled by the Mike Perkins variant, and indeed -- spoilers!

That element is one of my most serious gripes about Marvel's adaptation. We'll get into that a lot more as these reviews progress, but the short-hand version of my malcontent is this: what is Flagg doing with his hands?

Beckoning to us? I don't find that take on Flagg to be even the tiniest bit scary. Good news for you: if you do find it to be scary, you're going to love Perkins' design for Flagg, and you will see a lot more of it. This page was not included in the graphic novel. Pages Charlie Campion wakes his family up and the trio go on the run away from Project Blue.

Page 5: advertisement for Samurai Legend.

All ads were removed from the collected editions, as is always the case. I will not bother to mention that every time. Pages in Arnette, Stu and company pull Campion out of the car and see how sick he is also discovering his family's corpses. Pages in Brooklyn, Larry reminisces on his recent rock 'n' roll successes and personal failures, and then has a talk with his mother.

Pages in Arnette, Norm Bruett is getting sick. Stu suggests closing the station for the day. The Stand: Captain Trips 2 published October 8, cover date December regular cover, art by Lee Bermejo and Laura Martin variant cover, art by Mike Perkins and Laura Martin promo image for sketch variant cover, art by Lee Bermejo [sorry for the poor quality; I couldn't find a larger image of this one] That Lee Bermejo cover is very cool; he did some great work on this series. He only completed the first three arcs out of six total before moving on to other projects, but don't fret; Tomm Coker, who took over cover duties, did great work, too.

Doesn't matter. It's just a design thing. In fact, Perkins did a variant cover for each of the five issues of Captain Trips, and when put together the five form a single montage image.

Do I own those five variant issues? I do not. Maybe someday. In fact, I don't own a single variant cover from the entirety of The Stand. I'm only occasionally interested enough in variant covers to download them. I probably didn't even know that Marvel was doing variants at the time The Stand began, though, or I probably would have sprung for them. Probably not the sketch variants, though; those are cool, but not cool enough for me to download a third issue of a single comic.

The contents: Page 1: "Previously in The Stand" recap omitted from collected editions. Pages montage of the superflu spreading, beginning with Joe Bob Brentwood. Note that his removal from Arnette to Atlanta has occurred off-stage, as it were.

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I believe this is also the case in the novel. Pages Fran tells her father she is pregnant. Pages Nick Andros is beaten up by Ray Booth and friends. Pages in Shoyo, Arkansas, Nick wakes up in jail, though not under arrest, and meets Sheriff Baker.

Pages Stu meets Dr. Deitz, who tells him that he can't give him much info on his situation because it's classified.

Doubleday must have figured this comic would be read by large numbers of people who were not normally Stephen King readers.

This is the first appearance of Randall Flagg, who appeared on the cover s of issue 1 but nowhere inside the issue itself. This interview is not included in the graphic novel, but is included in The Stand Companion, which is part of the two-volume Omnibus edition.

Pages three pages from The Stand Sketchbook. The Stand: Captain Trips 3 published November 12, cover date January regular cover, art by Lee Bermejo and Laura Martin promo image for variant sketch cover, art by Lee Bermejo variant cover, art by Mike Perkins and Laura Martin The Bermejo cover of Lloyd and Poke is pretty damn great; very menacing, and satisfying art in and of itself.

I also like the Perkins variant with Larry on the cover.

Remember me complaining about Perkins' design for Flagg? Well, I've got similar issues with his design for Larry more on which later , except that I feel Perkins really captures Larry every once in a while.

This is one of those times. Page 2: a nurse in the Atlanta CDC has unknowingly contracted Captain Trips, and is romaing the hallways unwittingly infecting others.

Pages Lloyd and Poke stop in to "make a withdrawal" from a gas station. Things go poorly. Pages Fran tells her mother that she is pregnant. Pages at Sheriff Baker's house, the Sheriff is ill, and his wife volunteers Nick to serve as an impromptu deputy and go take care of the prisoners at the jail.

Nick does so, then dreams that he is walking through a cornfield, with something terrible following somewhere behind him. Pages Larry's mother is getting sick, and to keep from getting on her nerves, he goes and despondently sees a bit of the city. Pages Creighton informs General Starkey of a situation with some journalists having found out a bit too much, so Starkey orders that the journalists be stopped with extreme prejudice.

Pages having been relocated to a CDC in Vermont, Stu notices that his captors are now treating him much more tangibly as someone who is expendable; he wonders if he is ever going to see the light of day again. Omitted from collected editions, but included in The Stand Companion. Pages script-to-final comparisons for pages 2 and Page an ad for Night Shift. Pages pencil-art previews for issue 4.

Omitted from collected editions; included in The Stand Companion. I also like the Dutch-angle view on things. The Perkins variant features Trashcan Man, looking a bit more puckish and well-fed than he will look elsewhere in the comic.

Page 2: Nick tends to his prisoners. Pages Fan takes two phone calls: from Jess whom she still doesn't wish to marry and her father who tells her that her mother is sick with flu.

Pages Larry calls a bartender friend in Los Angeles, who tells him that things on the west coast are getting ugly. Pages Lloyd is visited by his lawyer. Pages Nick talks to Doc Soames, who tells him that soldiers seem to have closed Shoyo off to traffic.

He advises Nick to try and sneak out through the fields, but Nick has people to tend to, and won't. Pages Larry's mother is deathly ill, and he can only get a recorded message when he calls the hospital. Pages Fran and her father console each other; her mother has been carried away in an ambulance There are horror, fantasy, sci-fi, crime, real life, and many other subjects that comic books cover.

The subject most comic books have become known for is superheroes. The origin of the word Comic book comes from the comic strips that generally ran in newspapers. Some argue, however, that the comic in its purest form has been seen in early cultures, such as Egyptian wall art and prehistoric man cave paintings.

The word, "Comics," is still associated with both comic books, comic strips, and even comedians. Comic books were first introduced in America in when publishers started producing collected groups of comic strips from newspapers. The reused content from the newspapers eventually gave way to new and original content that became the American comic book. Everything changed with Action Comics 1.

This comic book introduced us to the character Superman in the year The character and comic was extremely successful and paved the way for future comic book publishers and new heroes such as we have today. Here are a few of the different formats: Comic Book — As described above, this is what the current term refers to in most circles. This format has been used by some publishers to help distinguish the content from comics with more mature subjects and content matter.

Lately, the graphic novel has seen a large amount of success by collecting a comic series, allowing downloadrs to read a whole comic story in one sitting. Although still not as popular as the regular comic book, the Graphic Novel has been outpacing comic books in terms of annual sales growth. Webcomics — This term is being used to describe both comic strips and comic books that can be found on the Internet. Many are smaller endeavors by people who just want to find a creative outlet, but others have turned their webcomics into successful industries such as Player Vs.

The comic book world has its own slang and jargon just like any other hobby. Here are some must-know terms for getting into comic books. The links will take you to more information.

The reused content from the newspapers eventually gave way to new and original content that became the American comic book.

Everything changed with Action Comics 1. This comic book introduced us to the character Superman in the year The character and comic was extremely successful and paved the way for future comic book publishers and new heroes such as we have today.

Here are a few of the different formats: Comic Book — As described above, this is what the current term refers to in most circles. This format has been used by some publishers to help distinguish the content from comics with more mature subjects and content matter.

Lately, the graphic novel has seen a large amount of success by collecting a comic series, allowing downloadrs to read a whole comic story in one sitting. Although still not as popular as the regular comic book, the Graphic Novel has been outpacing comic books in terms of annual sales growth.

Webcomics — This term is being used to describe both comic strips and comic books that can be found on the Internet. Many are smaller endeavors by people who just want to find a creative outlet, but others have turned their webcomics into successful industries such as Player Vs.

The comic book world has its own slang and jargon just like any other hobby. Here are some must-know terms for getting into comic books. The links will take you to more information.

Grade — The condition that a comic book is in. Graphic Novel — A thicker glue-bound comic book that is often a collection of other comic books or a stand alone story.

Mylar Bag — A protective plastic bag designed to protect a comic book. Comic Book Board — A thin piece of cardboard that is slipped behind a comic book in a mylar bag to keep the comic book from bending. Comic Box — A cardboard box designed to hold comic books.

Subscription — Publishers and comic book stores often offer monthly subscriptions to different comic books.Collecting comic books is an inherent part of downloading comic books. But, while they did look different than they do in my head and in the mini-series adaptation , they represented their characters well. It's basically the same as the novel, just visual. However this adaptation was a good one. Some have lasted the test of time and still continue to be popular today.

The art is truly impressive, and I don't think I've ever seen the "Walkin' Dude" look so fierce very cool. This was so much better than I expected. Next, you need to decide on where to sell your collection. Art by Mike Perkins.