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FREDERICK DOUGLASS EBOOK

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Project Gutenberg · 59, free ebooks · 7 by Frederick Douglass. Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave by Douglass. Project Gutenberg · 59, free ebooks · 7 by Frederick Douglass. Collected Articles of Frederick Douglass by Frederick Douglass. No cover available. Frederick Douglass by Charles W. Chesnutt. No cover available. Download; Bibrec Download This eBook.


Frederick Douglass Ebook

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This PDF ebook was become acquainted with FREDERICK DOUGLASS, the writer of . experience of FREDERICK DOUGLASS, as a slave, was not a. This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately pages of information about Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass. Print the Narrative. Editorial Reviews. From School Library Journal. Grade 9 Up-This classic text in both American Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass Kindle Edition. by.

Douglass was a serious constitutional thinker, and few Americans have ever analyzed race with more poignancy and nuance than this mostly self-taught genius with words. He was a radical editor, writer, and activist, informed by a hard-earned pragmatism.

Douglass was Jim-Crowed more times than he could count, but loved the Declaration of Independence, the natural-rights tradition, and especially the reinvented US Constitution fashioned in Reconstruction.

He fought against mob violence, but believed in certain kinds of revolutionary violence. In his own career he heroically tried to forge a livelihood with his voice and pen, but fundamentally was not a self-made man, an image and symbol he touted in a famous speech, and through which modern conservatives have adopted him as a proponent of individualism. He truly believed women were equal and ought to have all fundamental rights, but he conducted his personal life sometimes as a patriarch in a difficult marriage and while overseeing a large, often dysfunctional extended family.

Context and timing are often all.

But so are the interpretations of a very different writer, the former neoconservative turned neoliberal journalist and political theorist Michael Lind. Whose Douglass? Douglass was and is a hero; he has been all but adopted as a national figure in Ireland, Scotland, and Britain. His Narrative is read all over the world. He has appeared in countless murals, satirical political cartoons, twenty-first-century works of fiction, in paintings, and in a great deal of poetry. The sheer complexity of his thought and life makes him an icon held in some degree of commonality.

He was brilliant, courageous, and possessed a truly uncommon endurance.

Frederick Douglass by Charles W. Chesnutt

He wrote many words that will last forever. But he was also vain, arrogant at times, and hypersensitive to slights. He did not take well to rivals who challenged his position as the greatest spokesman of his race, although he also mentored many younger black writers and leaders. He liked being on a pedestal and did not intend to get knocked off.

Douglass was thoroughly and beautifully human. But I would not have written it had I not encountered the extraordinary private collection of Douglass material owned by Walter O. Evans of Savannah, Georgia. The older Douglass, from Reconstruction to the end of his life in , has never been so accessible or rendered so fascinating and complicated as in the Evans collection.

Several primary themes inform and give texture to my portrait of Douglass. Douglass was a man of words; spoken and written language was the only major weapon of protest, persuasion, or power that he ever possessed.

In one way, this book is the biography of a voice. The autobiographies are themselves a major theme of the book. Douglass wrote and rewrote his life in three remarkable autobiographies; all Douglass scholars are deeply dependent upon them. The three narratives, over twelve hundred pages in all, are infinitely rich as sources of his traumatic youth and his public life of more than fifty years.

In the memoirs he is a self-made hero who leaves a great deal unsaid, hidden from his readers and his biographers. But as he sits majestically at the head of the table, it is as if he slips out of the room right when we so wish to know more—anything—about his more private thoughts, motivations, and memories of the many conflicts in his personal life.

Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (Kobo eBook)

Confronting the autobiographer in Douglass is both a pleasure and a peril as his biographer. In America the people had turned from or never embraced their creeds or their God; the American Jerusalem, its temples and its horrid system of slavery, had to be destroyed; the nation had to face exile or extinction and bloody retribution; and only then could the people and the nation experience renewal, reinvention, and a possible new history.

Douglass was a living prophet of an American destruction, exile, war for its existence, and redemption. Jeremiah and Isaiah, as well as other prophets, were his guides; they gave him story, metaphor, resolve, and ancient wisdom in order to deliver his ferocious critique of slavery and his country before emancipation, and then his strained but hopeful narrative of its future after It is easy to call Douglass a prophet; this book attempts to show how he merits that lofty title.

He experiences moments that defy our understanding. Often his words begin to burn where conscience ends. This book attempts to demonstrate how Douglass came by his King James cadences, as well as how he used biblical story to break down and rebuild, as Jeremiah recollected his own charge, an American world.

His very existence gave the lie to slave owners: Initially mentored by William Lloyd Garrison, Douglass spoke widely, using his own story to condemn slavery. By the Civil War, Douglass had become the most famed and widely travelled orator in the nation.

In his unique and eloquent voice, written and spoken, Douglass was a fierce critic of the United States as well as a radical patriot. After the war he sometimes argued politically with younger African Americans, but he never forsook either the Republican party or the cause of black civil and political rights.

David W.

He is the author or editor of a dozen books, including American Oracle: He has worked on Douglass much of his professional life, and been awarded the Bancroft Prize, the Abraham Lincoln Prize, and the Frederick Douglass Prize, among others. Blight displays his lifelong interest in Douglass on almost every page, and his own voice is active and eloquent throughout the narrative.

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A brilliant book. Blight captures an icon in full humanity. From riveting drama in slavery and Civil War, his Douglass rises into clairvoyant genius on the blinkered centrality of race in our struggle for freedom. The resulting chronicle enriches our understanding of Douglass and the challenges he faced and offers a lesson for our own troubled times. Du Bois: The Biography of a Race, Prophet of Freedom is a triumph—elegantly written, with much new material about one of the most famous and important men in modern history.

An American Family. It is a work not only of stunning scholarship but also of literary artistry. The Civil War Era. A must-read.

Blight viscerally captures the vitality, strength, and determination of his subject. A masterful, comprehensive biography. Douglass spent his life trying to extinguish.

Prophet of Freedom, one of the best biographies of recent years. This is a remarkable book about a remarkable American and his enduring impact. Death and the American Civil War. Now he is brought vividly and delightfully to life once more in the flesh and bones of this masterful biography by one of our greatest historians.

Frederick Douglass: Prophet of Freedom is a monumental achievement, a must-read for anyone charting the history of a democracy when it is most severely under attack.

The Douglass who emerges from this massive work is not always heroic, or even likable, but Blight illuminates his personal struggles and achievements to emphasize what an extraordinary person he was.

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In so many ways, the central questions then are the central questions now. By clicking 'Sign me up' I acknowledge that I have read and agree to the privacy policy and terms of use. Must redeem within 90 days. See full terms and conditions and this month's choices. Tell us what you like, so we can send you books you'll love. Sign up and get a free eBook! Price may vary by retailer. Add to Cart Add to Cart. About The Book.

He spoke of a history that is central to the larger American story, one that is both contradictory and extraordinary.

He likened the African American experience to the infinite depths of Shakespeare and Scripture. Obama channeled Douglass in his dedication speech; knowingly or not, so do many people today. He saw his mother for the last time in , though he hardly knew her.

She died the following year. Douglass lived twenty years as a slave and nearly nine years as a fugitive slave subject to recapture.

From the s to his death in he attained international fame as an abolitionist, editor, orator of almost unparalleled stature, and the author of three autobiographies that are classics of the genre. As a public man he began his abolitionist career two decades before America would divide and fight a civil war over slavery that he openly welcomed.

Douglass was born in a backwater of the slave society of the South just as steamboats appeared in bays and on American rivers, and before the telegraph, the railroad, and the rotary press changed human mobility and consciousness. He died after the emergence of electric lights, the telephone, and the invention of the phonograph.

The renowned orator and traveler loved and used most of these elements of modernity and technology. Douglass was the most photographed American of the nineteenth century, explained in this book and especially by the intrepid research of three other scholars I rely upon. By the s, in sheer miles and countless numbers of speeches, he had few rivals as a lecturer in the golden age of oratory.

It is likely that more Americans heard Douglass speak than any other public figure of his times. Indeed, to see or hear Douglass became a kind of wonder of the American world. He struggled as well, with the pleasures and perils of fame as much as anyone else in his century, with the possible exceptions of General Ulysses S.

Grant or P. He lived to the age of lynching and Jim Crow laws, when America collapsed into retreat from the very victories and revolutions in race relations he had helped to win. In one lifetime of antislavery, literary, and political activism Douglass was many things, and this set of apparent paradoxes make his story so attractive to biographers, as well as to so many constituencies today.

He was a radical thinker and a proponent of classic nineteenth-century political liberalism; at different times he hated and loved his country; he was a ferocious critic of the United States and all of its hypocrisies, but also, after emancipation, became a government bureaucrat, a diplomat, and a voice for territorial expansion; he strongly believed in self-reliance and demanded an activist-interventionist government at all levels to free slaves, defeat the Confederacy, and protect black citizens against terror and discrimination.

Douglass was a serious constitutional thinker, and few Americans have ever analyzed race with more poignancy and nuance than this mostly self-taught genius with words. He was a radical editor, writer, and activist, informed by a hard-earned pragmatism.

Douglass was Jim-Crowed more times than he could count, but loved the Declaration of Independence, the natural-rights tradition, and especially the reinvented US Constitution fashioned in Reconstruction. He fought against mob violence, but believed in certain kinds of revolutionary violence.

In his own career he heroically tried to forge a livelihood with his voice and pen, but fundamentally was not a self-made man, an image and symbol he touted in a famous speech, and through which modern conservatives have adopted him as a proponent of individualism. He truly believed women were equal and ought to have all fundamental rights, but he conducted his personal life sometimes as a patriarch in a difficult marriage and while overseeing a large, often dysfunctional extended family.

Context and timing are often all. But so are the interpretations of a very different writer, the former neoconservative turned neoliberal journalist and political theorist Michael Lind.The sheer complexity of his thought and life makes him an icon held in some degree of commonality.

E-mail deze pagina. And finally, this book probes how Douglass was a many-sided intellectual, an editor, a writer in numerous genres—memoir, short-form editorials, extended speeches, and one work of fiction. Nothing has been left undone to cripple their intellects, darken their minds, debase their moral nature, obliterate all traces of their relationship to mankind; and yet how wonderfully they have sustained the mighty load of a most frightful bondage, under which they have been groaning for centuries!

These changes are historical, inextricably linked to events and time, not merely a matter of moral growth or decline; and they provide a model for many other leaders, particularly African American, who have undergone the same process in the years since.

Among them they produced twenty-one grandchildren for the Douglasses.