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BIRT TUTORIAL PDF

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Designer. (future). XML. Report. Design. Report. Document. HTML. PDF BIRT will address a new problem space for Eclipse that broadens the appeal of the. BIRT is an open source technology platform used to create data visualizations and reports that can be embedded into rich client and web applications. Contains. •Data Sources: Connections to database. •Data Sets: Same as a Record set. Allows users to navigate through. Query Results. •Report Parameters .


Birt Tutorial Pdf

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Actuate, ActuateOne, the Actuate logo, Archived Data Analytics, BIRT, BIRT report design file, PDF files created from the design file are appropriately tagged. Viewing the BIRT in the browser report utilizing Paging and Exporting to formats such as. PDF and Excel functionality. Overview - Eclipse Open. View more Tutorials: Report Programming. 1- Introduction; 2- Reporting interface after project completion; 3- The installation requires; 4- Create BIRT Project.

Add New Data Source The new report is displayed in the layout view. It has four columns but no data. In Eclipse, open the Data Explorer. Choose Classic Models Inc. Sample Database from the data source list. Click Next and then Finish to exit the data source wizard.

Select the new Data Source from the list. The Edit Data Set screen opens. Click Preview Results to verify that the data connection is OK and you can see some data on the screen.

Preview Report Open the Data Explorer window.

Open the new data set. You should see the fields from the Customers table. Drag the fields onto the report as shown below. Click the Preview tab.

You should see a list of customers on the report. This can be due to various versions in the selected repositories, or because a particular package is not in the chosen repositories, in which case, you will need to add a new repository to your list. Sometimes you can just click on the Select Required Packages button, and the necessary packages will be selected from the chosen repositories. Now, with your packages selected, you can click on Next.

The packages will then be downloaded from the selected repositories. Once finished downloading, a prompt will come up to install the packages you selected. You can either confirm each package individually, or just select Install All. Once completed, you will be asked to restart Eclipse. At this point, you can follow the steps to install iText given earlier, and your BIRT installation will be complete. That's OK.

This book will be no different. These scenarios provide a basic context for the learner to relate the topic information to, and hopefully facilitate absorbing the information.

In this chapter we will look at a very simple scenario, in order to get us started with our first report.

You work for a toy company called Classic Cars. Classic Cars specializes in selling models of classic cars and motorcycles. Classic Cars uses a centralized database for all company operations, such as employee listing, offices, customers, products, and sales history. This information is in a relational database that is stored locally on your machine, as Classic Cars is a small company.

Through this chapter, I will walk you through creating your first report, which will be a list of all employees who work for the company. I choose this for a number of reasons.

First, it is a fairly simple database query to build and understand. However, I highly recommend getting some basic familiarity with database concepts, and SQL in particular. Finally, I will show you where you can go through another guided tutorial, accessible from right within the BIRT environment. You might as well have access to all available resources for further learning.

We have defined a clear objective for our basic report, and now is the time to jump into the basic concepts of the BIRT Environment. A Workspace is a location where projects get stored. This is very useful for Java developers, who may want to re-use projects; however for a report developer, a single Workspace should suffice.

Eclipse uses different perspectives as interfaces for different functionality and tools for particular tasks. For instance, if you are writing a Java program, you would use one of the several Java perspectives available, which would allow you access to outlines, class views, and other tabs. If you are debugging a program, you would use the debug perspective, it gives you access to a tab with variables, tools bars for controlling the flow of programs, breakpoints, and other debugging functions.

1. Introduction

The BIRT report perspective can always be accessed from one of the several ways to open perspectives in Eclipse. Typically on the upper right-hand side is the Open Perspective icon for quicker access. For this book, we will keep this default.

However, if you wanted to change the layout, you would only need to "drag and drop" any of the workbench tabs to another section.

The Navigator is fairly universal among Eclipse perspectives, as it is what is used to browse the current workspace for contained projects. Under the navigator, you can create and manage projects, reports, libraries, templates, and various other files that would be contained in your projects.

The Navigator can be used to do many of the same functions that you can perform under the menu bar, under the File section. If your workspace contains many different reporting projects, you can also use the Navigator to go into those projects, so that other projects are not visible during editing. In the next screenshot, I have a single project called StyleSheetExample with a single report design file and a report library, which we will discuss in Chapter 9 From this menu, you can see that the right arrow is available to allow me to go into the StyleSheetExample project, which is like double-clicking on a folder in Windows Explorer.

I also have the Sync with Editor double-arrows clicked, which allows me to automatically give focus to each of these items if they are open in Eclipse. So when would you use multiple reports in a single project, or why would you want to break out projects instead of storing all your reports in a single project? This is really a matter of preference. I will typically store reports based on real-life projects. This allows me to keep report and projects separated.

If I were building an online reporting portal that uses many shared components, I would also put all reports in their own project, with a library housing the shared components.

This is useful because online reports have the tendency to require multiple sub-reports, and very rarely can be captured in a single report. There is more on using libraries and on linking in reports in Chapter 7. This will actually run a report in a separate and interactive instance with full export capabilities, which differs from the Preview tab under the Designer pane.

Online training

Things that you get with actually running a report instead of previewing are the navigation features, pagination, table of contents functionality, and the ability to see how reports would look in built-in BIRT Web Report Viewer. Running a report from the Navigator is available from the report submenu when you right-click on a Report design file under the Navigator, as illustrated in the following screenshot.

The Outline Next on the agenda is the Outline. Now if there were one portion of the BIRT perspective that is often overlooked, yet provides good return value when used, it would be the Outline.

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The Outline provides a hierarchical view of a reports structure that you can use to select, edit properties, view events, and edit scripts. Oftentimes, it is the best way to get access to particular elements of a report for editing with precision, without the hassle of attempting to select them in the graphical Editor.

It is very easy to select and expand high-level elements to easily select contained report elements, such as rows, cells, and groups. Rather than having to muck around with the Report Designer to find the element you are changing, you have it right at your fingertips with the Outline. It also makes things easier when you begin scripting, to ensure [ 37 ] The BIRT Environment and Your First Report that you are writing script for the correct components.

I can tell you this from my experience; it is an incredibly useful view, and learning how to use it can save time and headaches in the long run. In the following example image, I am showing an expanded view of a very simple report demonstrating the different elements of reports that are visible in a report Outline.

Just as in Visual Basic you can "drag and drop" components like buttons, text boxes, and labels into a form, BIRT allows you to "drag and drop" visual report components such as labels, data text items, HTML text items, graphics, and layout modifiers such as grids and tables. In the next chapter we will cover the various report components, their purpose, and how each one is used in a report. Now although we have not gotten into the topic of scripting in BIRT, it is worth mentioning that the Palette does change when you open up the Script Editor in BIRT, to give a simplified view of different low-level script objects that are available.

If this is a topic that we have not gotten to, why do I mention it here? Because this is one of those things that I wish I had known early on in my BIRT development experiences, which I didn't find out until later and kicked myself for not knowing about it.

Birt Reporting Plugin

As strange as that sounds, you will thank me when we get there. The Data Explorer is such a place. The Data Explorer provides several different data-related functions. From here you can manage data connections to your Data Sources. For example, this is one of the locations where you can manage your database connections and drivers and any sort of custom data adapters.

You will also manage your data queries from this pane. Locale object as an optional parameter. This way the locale used in the report can be specified explicitly.

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Locale object describing the locale the report is render to. If omitted or null the locale provided by grails is used runAndRender : same as runAndRender but reads from an input stream reportName - name of the report inputStream - the input stream holding the report file content parameters - parameters to be passed to the report engine running the report renderOptions - options specifying the output format locale - a java. If omitted or null the locale provided by grails is used run : run a given report generating a report document containing the data reportName - name of the report without extension , the file name will be derived of it parameters - parameters to be passed to the report engine running the report reportDocumentName - name of the report document locale - a java.

If omitted or null the locale provided by grails is used run : same as run but reads from an input stream reportName - name of the report inputStream - the input stream holding the report file content parameters - parameters to be passed to the report engine running the report reportDocumentName - name of the report document locale - a java.

If omitted or null the locale provided by grails is used render : render a report document into a specific output format reportDocumentName - name of the report document parameters - parameters to be passed to the report engine running the report renderOptions - options specifying the output format locale - a java. If omitted or null the locale provided by grails is used Configuring the plugin The plugin supports configuration via the default Grails configuration file Config.

You can also use the per-environment configuration feature. Currently supported options: birt.Click OK. Once completed, you will be asked to restart Eclipse. The Outline view provides a compact overview of your entire report structure. Cross tab. This Eclipse-based set of plug-ins offers a variety of tools to build reports quickly.

Running a report from the Navigator is available from the report submenu when you right-click on a Report design file under the Navigator, as illustrated in the following screenshot.

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The General tab is where elements such as the element name, font selection, font color, alignment, and style sheet selection are located. Mian Aasim Mahmood Page 4 of 43 For example. Mian Aasim Mahmood Page 40 of This will be the most common property you work with when working with Labels; however, it is not the only one.