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THE SWIMMING DRILL BOOK PDF

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The Swimming Drill Book - Free ebook download as PDF File .pdf), Text File .txt ) or read book online for free. That's where this new edition of The Swimming Drill Book delivers. Written by Ruben Guzman, a year coaching veteran, the second edition. SWIMMING DRILLS. TH freestyle, we must learn to shift weight forward, and achieve a soon begin to sink, leaving the swimmer in an “uphill” floating.


The Swimming Drill Book Pdf

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British Library Cataloguing in Publication Data. A catalogue record for this book is available from the British Library. The Best Swimming Drills. Maidenhead: . This books (The Swimming Drill Book (The Drill Book Series) [PDF]) Made by Ruben J. Guzman About Books Swimming Drill Book To. This book features drills designed to systematically improve the skills of a competitive swimmer—whether a beginner or a national-level athlete. In addition .

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The Swimming Drill Book Contents- pages

Physical Education. Recreation and Leisure. Sport Management and Sport Business. Sports and Activities. Strength Training and Conditioning. My e-Products. Video on Demand. Case Studies in Sport and Exercise Psychology. International Journal of Golf Science. International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance. Begin slowly, and gradually build up speed.

Tip Practice at home in front of a mirror. Watch to see that your arms recover directly above your shoulders. Repeat drill 15 Streamline Back Flutter Kick. Hold a good streamline and correct body position a, b. Begin to kick more forcefully and quickly. Tip See how hard you can kick so as to boil the water as much as possible.

Have a boiling contest with a friend! Remember to boil, not splash. Begin by pushing off the wall on your back with just one arm above your head in a half-streamline position. Position your extended arm with the palm facing up and the thumb in. Straighten your elbow. Extend your arm forward from the shoulder, close to but not quite touching the head. Keep your other arm down at your side. Keep the bottom of your rib cage up and your head steady a, b.

Keep the ears level, just below the surface. Tip Balance a cup on top of your chest, right at the bottom of your sternum. In chapter 1, you saw that the body has a natural buoyancy and that some people have better buoyancy than others. The best swimmers move through the water with most of the body below the surface, but a good deal of the body is above, too.

Humans are not designed to move through the water as fish do; we do not move completely underwater with our bodies in a vertical position. And, we are not flat as rafts are, either. Much of the sailboat is actually underwater. As it moves through the water, an interesting thing happens when the sails catch the wind just right—the boat lifts and cuts through the water even more easily. This usually happens when the boat is at more of an angle. Swimmers can shape their body position for freestyle and backstroke the same way—at an angle that gives the body more lift, less drag, and greater speed!

Procedure When you are providing propulsion from a flutter kick, you can position your body on an angle to imitate a sailboat and get an additional lift. For most, this angle is about 45 degrees, yet it can vary from one individual to another. The key is to feel the body lift to the highest position possible while moving through the water. The higher the body position, the less drag. The less drag, the easier it is to move through the water. And the easier it is to move through the water, the faster you swim!

Focus on feeling the shoulder, elbow, and side of the rib cage all on the same side at the surface. This drill is the most important of the backstroke series. Rotate the extended arm deeper in the water, and move the body to the sailboat angle as you continue kicking. When your body is in the sailboat angle, you should feel the shoulder, elbow, and side of the rib cage on the other side all being at the surface.

Rotate the extended arm so that the palm is vertical, with the pinky down and the thumb up. The arm should be 6 to 10 inches below the surface. I like this hand paddle because of the skeg, which allows the swimmer to feel the correct alignment.

No other hand paddle has this feature. Keeping the head position steady, slowly begin to roll one shoulder up and into the sailboat angle on one side. Pause at the sailboat angle so that you can feel the shoulder, elbow, and side of the rib cage up at the surface on that side a.

Hold the position for a count of three. Slowly begin to roll your body to the other side b. You should feel your rib cage up at the surface the whole time you are rolling across to the other side. Continue repeating the motion, rolling from one side to the other and back again.

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It is not important how fast you do this drill, only how well you do it! Keep the rib cage up. Tip For an advanced version, get into deep water, and position your body verti- cally. From the deck, have someone place his or her hands on both sides of your head and hold you just above the surface.

Then, work on rolling your shoulders back and forth. This creates a washing machine action. Begin as you did drill 45 Shoulder Roll Drill a. Once you have rolled your body to one side, hold the sailboat angle, lift the arm on the same side as the shoulder that is up b.

Keeping the elbow and wrist straight, and with the thumb up and the pinky down, slowly lift the arm just a few inches above the surface of the water. Then, slowly lower the arm back to your side. Roll to the other side, and repeat c, d. Tip Look down the top of your arm as you lift. Be sure that your arm is pointing straight.

Hold this position for a count of three. You will use only the extended arm that is next to the lane rope; the other arm will stay down at your side. Grab the lane rope. Gently pull your body along the rope b , completing the pull down at your thigh. As you complete the pull, roll the shoulder of the pulling arm up so that you are in the sailboat angle on the other side c.

Hold this position for a count of three while you continue kicking. Slowly recover the pulling arm by lifting it through the air d. Your hand travels in a large arc until it enters the water overhead. As your hand enters the water, roll the opposite shoulder up into the sailboat angle. This completes one cycle.

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Continue to repeat this cycle. You should follow this pattern: Tip Recite this pattern to yourself as you do the drill: This is another key drill in the backstroke series.

The pulling action will be along an imaginary lane rope that is about 1 foot deep. Start by kicking in a lateral backstroke kicking position right next to the real lane rope with the extended arm next to the rope a.

Hold this posi- tion for a count of three. You will use only the arm that is extended next to the lane rope; the other arm will stay down at your side. Pull under the lane rope along an imaginary lane rope b , and complete the pull down at your thigh. As you complete the pull, roll the shoulder of the pulling arm up, well above the surface c.

Slowly recover the pulling arm d. As your hand enters the water, roll the opposite shoulder up. This com- pletes one cycle. Remember this pattern: Tip Recite this cycle to yourself as you do the drill: Recover both arms at the same time b. Once the hands enter the water, hold this position, with your arms stretched overhead and your hands barely underwater, for a count of three c.

Avoid any bouncing.

Procedure This drill is the same as drill 48 Controlled One-Arm Backstroke , except that in this drill you will use both arms. Start by kicking in a lateral backstroke kicking position with the right arm extended and the left arm down at your side a. Switch arms at the same time by pulling with the right arm and recover- ing with the left arm b until you reach the lateral backstroke kicking position with the left arm up and right arm down c.

Repeat the switch. This completes one stroke cycle. Tip Switch both arms at the same time. Imagine a teeter-totter—let your shoulders rock back and forth with that motion.

Let the shoulders lead the way.

Rotate first the shoulders, then the arms. This is the fourth key drill in the backstroke series. Procedure Perform this drill exactly like drill 48 Controlled One-Arm Backstroke but without pausing between strokes. Start in a lateral backstroke kicking position a.

You will use the arm extended above your head, and the other arm will stay down at your side. Using a continuous action, pull and recover one arm b-d.

Concentrate on excellent shoulder and body roll and a steady head position. Do not pause at any point in the stroke. Tip Watch your shoulders, and rotate each one into the sailboat angle each time. Remember to imagine that teeter-totter movement. Procedure Perform this drill exactly as drill 48 Controlled One-Arm Backstroke , but use both arms at the same time. Start by kicking in a lateral backstroke kicking position. Using a smooth, continuous action, switch both arms at the same time a.

Let the shoulders lead the arm action. Lift the shoulders to the sailboat angle on the recovery. Continue to repeat the cycle. Tip Watch your shoulders, and rotate each one out to the sailboat angle.

Now that you have excellent shoulder and body roll in the backstroke, you will be able to swim the stroke with what feels like a wider stroke. This will feel deceptively easy, and if the stroke is correct, it should.

Swim a smooth, controlled backstroke a, b , concentrating on feeling your hands enter the water at the 10 and 2 positions.

You may also notice that the stroke will move a little quicker. This is okay. Be sure you keep the good shoulder roll, steady body position, and strong kicking. Have your coach or training partner stand on the deck at the end of your lane to see if your hands enter the water right above your shoulders.

Do not over- or underreach. The most common problem is overreach- ing when the hands enter past the line of the respective shoulder; for example, if the hand enters directly over the head. Make adjustments as necessary.

Tip Swimming next to the lane rope is another way to check your arm entry posi- tion. Your hand should enter the water right next to the lane rope.

Also, while swimming next to the lane rope, perform a few strokes with your eyes closed to help you really feel the stroke. However, in competition swimmers often try to speed up their time by moving their arms faster through the air, trying so hard that their strokes actually deteriorate and slow them down. To move faster, swimmers must balance good technique with strong pulling and kicking.

The drills in this chapter will help swimmers apply these characteristics of the best freestylers to their own strokes. Take a deep breath, push off the wall, and place your hands in a stream- line position—nose down, with the hands, shoulders, hips, and heels at the surface a.

Your hips should be right at the surface. Slowly let your air out and go about halfway across the pool, then stop. While the splashing may look impressive, it does nothing! This will help get you ready for the freestyle drills. Begin by pushing off the wall on your front with just one arm extended in a half-streamline position a. Your extended arm should be positioned with the palm facing down. Your elbow should be straight and your arm should be extended forward from the shoulder, close to but not quite touching the head.

Keep your shoulders and hips up. Keep your head steady. Slowly let out your air as you go about halfway across the pool, and then stop. Keep the ears level and just below the surface. This is the most important key drill of the freestyle series.

Review the sailboat angle discussion in drill 43 The Sailboat Angle. You will be focusing on getting into the sailboat angle while on your front side. You should feel the shoulder, elbow, and the side of the hip on the other side all being at the surface.

This is the sailboat angle. Rotate the extended arm so that the palm is horizontal, facing down. The arm should be 6 to 10 inches below the surface b. Look straight down at the bottom of the pool, with just the back of the head breaking the surface. With a steady kick, go halfway across the pool without a breath.

Stop, and repeat. This is another key drill in the freestyle series. Push off the wall into the position described in drill 56 Lateral Freestyle Kick. Hold the sailboat angle steady throughout this drill. Begin kicking while looking down at the bottom with the back of your head just barely above the surface a. Be sure to blow a steady stream of bubbles. Rotate your head to turn away from the extended arm. Turn the head enough so that your mouth is at the surface and you can sneak a breath in b.

Rotate your head back down so that you are looking straight down again. Begin to blow bubbles as soon as your face reenters the water. Feel your shoulder, elbow, and hip up at all times. This drill is excellent for helping swimmers with chronic shoulder problems retrain their strokes, and usually corrects the problem. Most shoulder pain is caused by improper mechanics, not a deficiency of pain reliever!

Hold a half-board at the bottom with one arm, and push off. Move your body to the lateral kick position with your head in the breathing position, and kick. Place your other arm down at your side so that the back of your hand is against your thigh a.

Then, grab an imaginary zipper between your thumb and forefnger, and pull the zipper up along your body until you reach your armpit b. Allow your wrist to fex. Your thumbnail should stay against your body, pointing toward the middle of your body. Your palm should remain facing up. As you pull up, your wrist should be relaxed and your elbow should come straight up. Once you complete the lifting action, slowly return the arm in the same manner to the starting position.

Be sure to practice on both sides. Tip Try doing this drill while facing a lane rope or high wall. Keep your hand next to your body. This will force you to recover properly. Hold a half-board with one hand. Place your other hand which will be pulling under the board with the knuckles against the board.

Start with your eyes looking down and the back of your head just barely above the surface. Kick while you hold this position for a count of three as you blow bubbles a. After counting to three, begin to pull your arm down and roll your body to the sailboat position b.

As your hand passes under your shoulder, your head should begin turning to the side to breathe. Complete the pull in the stretch position, the same position as in drill 56 Lateral Freestyle Kick. Hold this stretched position for an additional count of three. Begin the zip-up action to bring your elbow up.

As your hand reaches the middle of your back, begin to return your head to the forward position d. The hand should not pass in front of your face on the recovery. Once the hand reaches the shoulder, rotate the hand forward so that it can slice into the water just in front of the half-board e. Then, slide the hand under the half-board to complete the cycle f. Practice with each arm. Repeat this cycle to yourself as you perform the drill: Tip For an advanced version, perform this drill next to a lane rope.

Use the top of the rope as a guide for your hand when recovering your arm. Let the finger- nails of your first and middle fingers gently glide across the top of the lane rope as if it were a piano. This drill will also allow you to feel the complete extension of the freestyle stroke. This is the next key drill in the freestyle series.

Start by kicking in the position described in drill 56 Lateral Freestyle Kick , with the left arm extended and the right arm down at your side a. The shoulder of your right arm will be above the surface. Keep your eyes looking down, and hold your breath.

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Kick in this position for a count of three. Switch arms at the same time by pulling with the left arm and recover- ing with the right arm until you reach the position described in drill 56 Lateral Freestyle Kick , with the right arm up and the left arm down b-e. Try to go all the way across the pool without breathing.

Use the rhythm of 1, 2, switch, 1, 2, switch. It works great! You can really practice the control of the stroke without having to move the head to breathe. This drill will also allow the swimmer to feel the complete extension of the freestyle stroke while breathing. Start by kicking in the position described in drill 56 Lateral Freestyle Kick , with the left arm extended and the right arm down at your side.

Rotate your head to the breathing position. With a synchronized action of rotating the head through the water all the way to the breathing position on the other side, switch arms at the same time by pulling with the left arm and recovering with the right arm until you reach the Lateral Freestyle Kick position, with the right arm up and the left arm down a-c. Repeat the switch and head rotation d-f. This drill will also allow you to feel the complete extension of the freestyle stroke with breathing to one side first.

Keep your eyes looking down, and remember to blow bubbles. Switch your arms at the same time by pulling with the left arm and recovering with the right arm until you reach the lateral freestyle kick position with the right arm extended and the left arm down b.

As you switch, rotate your head to breathe to your left c. Repeat the switch d , and rotate the head so your eyes are down. Continue to repeat this cycle for the entire lap. Change to breathing on the other side on the next lap. Get comfortable breathing on either side. These unique paddles are specifi- cally designed to enhance the freestyle technique. You will get the proper feel for how to move the arm through the water, and also how to recover properly.

This will be just like the previ- ous drill, except the timing will be a little quicker and the breathing will be every third stroke. Start by kicking in the lateral freestyle kick position with the left arm extended and the right arm down at your side. The shoulder of your right arm will be above the surface a. Kick in this position for a count of two. Switch your arms at the same time by pulling with the left arm and recovering with the right arm b, c until you reach the lateral freestyle kick position with the right arm extended and the left arm down.

As you switch, keep your eyes looking down and slowly blow bubbles. Kick in this position for a count of two d. Switch your arms at the same time by pulling with the right arm and recovering with the left arm until you reach the position described in drill 56 Lateral Freestyle Kick , with the left arm extended and the right arm down e. As you switch, rotate your head to breathe to your right. Repeat the switch, and rotate the head so your eyes are down. This com- pletes one stroke cycle.

Continue to repeat this cycle for the entire lap, breathing every third stroke. To execute this drill properly, you will need to have excellent kicking and stroke control.

Description

This is an advanced drill. Procedure The action of this drill is very similar to that of drill 51 Continuous One-Arm Backstroke. Remember to move your shoulders back and forth continuously from the sailboat angle on one side to the sailboat angle on the other side. Start in the position described in drill 56 Lateral Freestyle Kick. Use the extended arm in front, and keep the other arm down at your side a. Using a smooth, continuous action, pull and recover the one arm you are working b. Concentrate on excellent body roll and good head position control.

Breathe on the same side that you are pulling c. Roll the opposite shoul- der so that it completely breaks the surface and reaches the sailboat angle. Keep the hips up. Repeat the action for the other arm. Reach all the way forward, and pull all the way back. This is the final drill in the freestyle series.

Procedure Perform this drill as drill 64 Continuous One-Arm Freestyle but use both arms at the same time. Start by kicking in a one-arm streamline position a. Using a smooth, continuous action, switch both arms at the same time b. Pause briefy at the point of full extension in the stroke c.

Be sure to reach full extension and to complete each pull. Continue to repeat the cycle d. Use alternate breathing. Make sure they slice into the water cleanly, and notice whether you have very few air bubbles passing past your face as you swim. The fewer air bubbles, the better.

There are almost as many styles of breaststroke as there are breast- stroke coaches. However, some fundamentals are common to almost all great breaststrokers. The breaststroke drills in this chapter will teach swimmers these essential techniques for enhancing their strokes. After mastering these fundamentals, they can develop individual variations. Stand in shallow water so that your shoulders are just above the surface.

Position your arms out in front of you so that your thumbs are touching and your palms are facing down and slightly out a. Begin the pulling action by sweeping your hands outward just under the surface. In essence, you will shape an equilateral triangle; your arms will be the sides and the distance between the hands will be the base.

Rotate the hands inward c , begin to bend the elbows back, and sweep your hands in d. Shoot the hands forward together, just at or below the surface. Extend your arms completely forward to the starting position f.

Repeat the cycle. You should always see them in front of your shoulders. Focus on keeping the tip of the paddle facing forward at all times as you sweep out and sweep in.

This drill also enhances arm pull speed and helps swimmers who tend to overpull or who have a slow arm pull. Procedure You will basically do the same arm action as in drill 66 Standing Breaststroke Pulling Action , but you will now add vertical kicking in deeper water. Keep your body straight and your head above the surface. Begin the pulling action by sweeping your hands outward just under the surface b.

In essence, you will shape an equilat- eral triangle; your arms will be the sides and the distance between the hands will be the base. Rotate the hands inward, begin to bend the elbows back, and sweep your hands in c. Next, shoot the hands forward together, just at or below the surface e.

Extend your arms completely forward to the starting position. Focus on keeping the tip of each paddle facing forward at all times as you sweep out and sweep in. Keeping the head up permits swim- mers to see their arm pull in action and serves as a self-check.

It is also more challenging with the head up. Kick forward with your arms extended in front of your body, head lifted, with the eyes just above the surface and chin tucked in. Hold your arms extended for a count of three. Then, pull and recover quickly, using the breaststroke arm motion you practiced in the previous two drills a.

Get plenty of lift while pulling. Lift your shoulders higher above the surface, but keep your chin tucked in b. Return your head to the start- ing position with the eyes just above the surface. Continue to repeat the cycle c.

The eyes should be just above the surface in the starting position. Keep your chin tucked in while pulling. Look downward at about a degree angle, keeping the head angle steady. Blow bubbles when your lower face is in the water to allow you to breathe in quickly when you pull.

Lift the body, not the chin. Keep your chin tucked in so that you can always look through the top of the window. Make sure your head angle remains steady. Focus on keep- ing the tip of each paddle facing forward at all times as you sweep out and sweep in. This drill is the same as the previous drill, except you will change your head position to start off in the sliding position. Kick forward with your arms extended in front of your body, eyes down, with the back of the head just above the surface and chin tucked in.

Then, pull and recover quickly, using the breaststroke arm motion you practiced in the previous two drills a-c. Lift your shoulders higher above the surface, but keep your nose down and your chin tucked in. Return your head to the starting position with the eyes just above the surface. The eyes should be looking straight down in the starting position. Look downward right into the surface of the water when you pull, and keep the head angle steady.

Blow bubbles when your face is in the water to allow you to breathe in quickly when you pull. You can still breathe without having to look forward. Feel your hips come up to the surface when you extend. Review the breaststroke kicking drills from chapter 2 before embarking on this drill. Start by pushing off with your nose down and your head barely breaking the surface. Your arms should be completely extended; and your shoulders, hips, and heels should all be at the surface.

Point your toes a. After you push off the wall, hold the slide position for a count of three. Be sure to blow bubbles the whole time your face is in the water. Lift your head up so that your chin is on the surface b. Your chin should be tucked in and your eyes should be directed downward. As you lower your head back into the water, begin your kick by bringing your heels in, then rotate the toes out c. As your head comes back into position in the water, kick out and squeeze.

You will be kicking into the slide position d. Exhale while your face is back in the water e. Hold the slide position for a count of three, then repeat the cycle. It is the best way to develop the power of the breaststroke. This drill is especially useful with new swimmers and with swimmers who have timing issues that need to be corrected. Push off the wall with your nose down, in a streamline.

Feel your hands, shoulders, hips, and heels at the surface. Take a breath before you push off and then slowly exhale when your face is in the water. Hold the slide for a count of six. Insert one stroke in the middle of two slides. Push off from the wall, and slide for a count of three. Then, use this pattern to do one stroke: Slide for another count of three, and stop. Make sure that when you add a stroke of breaststroke, you go much far- ther.

In this drill, you will simply practice the breaststroke with one pull for each kick and slide, one after another a-c. Follow this pattern: Hold each slide for a count of three. Keep your nose down on the slide. On the slide, the back of your head should be at the surface.

Count the number of strokes per lap. Like this presentation? Why not share!

An annual anal Embed Size px. Start on. Show related SlideShares at end. WordPress Shortcode. Published in: Full Name Comment goes here. Are you sure you want to Yes No. Be the first to like this. No Downloads.As your hand reaches the middle of your back, begin to return your head to the forward position d. Instructor Resources. Your somersault should be in a fairly tight tuck position. Getting enough air while swimming in open water is critically important.

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