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THE SHALLOWS EBOOK

Sunday, June 2, 2019


Editorial Reviews. From Bookmarks Magazine. One of the major issues dividing the critics was eBook features: Highlight, take notes, and search in the book; In this edition, page numbers are just like the physical edition; Length: pages; Word Wise. Editorial Reviews. About the Author. Nicholas Carr is the author of The Big Switch : Rewiring the Kindle Store · Kindle eBooks · Science & Math. When Nicholas Carr posed that question, in a celebrated Atlantic Monthly cover story, he tapped into a well of anxiety about how the Internet is changing us. Now, Carr expands his argument into the most compelling exploration of the Internet’s intellectual and cultural.


The Shallows Ebook

Author:EBONI CLAIRDAY
Language:English, Spanish, Portuguese
Country:South Africa
Genre:Politics & Laws
Pages:543
Published (Last):30.03.2015
ISBN:754-8-30372-390-4
ePub File Size:17.41 MB
PDF File Size:12.57 MB
Distribution:Free* [*Register to download]
Downloads:50459
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By moving from the depths of thought to the shallows of distraction, the web, it seems, is actually fostering ignorance. The Shallows is not a manifesto for luddites, nor does it seek to turn back the clock. Rather it is a No eBook available. By moving from the depths of thought to the shallows of distraction, the web, ' The shallows' is not a manifesto for luddites, nor does it seek to turn back the. Read "The Shallows How the internet is changing the way we think, read and remember" by Nicholas Carr available from Rakuten Kobo. Sign up today and get .

Mild-mannered, never polemical, with nothing of the Luddite about him, Carr makes his points with a lot of apt citations and wide-ranging erudition. See if you can stay off the web long enough to read it!

Man, Nature, and Climate Change. Whether you do it in pixels or pages, read this book.

Witty, ambitious, and immensely readable, The Shallows actually manages to describe the weird, new, artificial world in which we now live. The fruits of this capacity we call civilization.

But all that is finished, perhaps. Welcome to the shallows, where the un-educating of homo sapiens begins.

The Shallows

Nicholas Carr does a wonderful job synthesizing the recent cognitive research. In doing so, he gently refutes the ideologists of progress, and shows what is really at stake in the daily habits of our wired lives: What emerges for the reader, inexorably, is the suspicion that we have well and truly screwed ourselves.

Crawford, author of Shop Class As Soulcraft. Nick Carr provides a thought-provoking and intellectually courageous account of how the medium of the Internet is changing the way we think now and how future generations will or will not think. Few works could be more important.

The Story and Science of the Reading Brain. Cart Support Signed in as: See Larger Image. Available Our Retail Price: By signing up you agree to W.

When Carr goes online he complains of constant interruption by email, Twitter and Facebook updates, though I seem to have the option to leave clients unopened or turn off notifications. This kind of thing is what I would consider basic intellectual ecology in the online age.

Yet such self-discipline the adoption of "filtering strategies", as Palfrey and Gasser put it doesn't seem to have occurred to Carr: in front of a computer screen, we are for him impotent and without volition, so the only options are to drown in cyberbabble or to "disconnect" completely. By far the best part of his book is a critique of digital-age metaphors: the assumption that computer "memory" can replace human memory, and the idea of the brain itself as a computer.

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Yet Carr's portrait of the average internet user as a skimming machine that will respond obediently to any shiny new input is dehumanising in just the same way. Ironically, since Carr worries that the internet will stop us reading entire books, there is no need to read his entire book to understand his argument.

He first put forward this thesis in a Atlantic article, " Is Google making us stupid? The expansion into book form has involved a lot of superfluous padding — potted histories of printing and other technologies, and sepia-tinted autobiographical fragments — that serves only to fill space when not making actually ridiculous claims.

Like the majority of contemporary books, then, The Shallows does not justify its length: its natural form was always that of a pithy provocation, so as an argument for the superiority of book-length prose it is rather self-defeating.

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Sometimes, however, it does seem as though the author's memory really has been degraded by his internet abuse. Well, both cannot be true. Either you can think deeply when using the internet, or the internet prevents you from doing so.

It is easy to see which version is correct; and which version, conversely, makes for a more polemically enticing sales pitch. All too rarely do defenders of books and, for that matter, newspapers ask themselves the uncomfortable question: might it be that people are reading fewer of the products not because people are becoming more stupid but because many of the products are not actually very good?

It is refreshing, then, to turn to Born Digital, a serious and engaging study of how "digital natives" people who grew up with the internet actually behave online, which aims to address the "culture of fear [.

Its authors are robustly dismissive, for example, of tabloid scares about "cyberbullying" and "cyberstalking", or of the notion that Wikipedia represents a new low in literary civilisation because it contains errors "Information quality issues are neither internet-specific nor new to the digital age".

On the other hand, we should all worry far more about the way personally identifying data is collected and used.Tom Flanagan.

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Tom Nichols. We might be consigned to the intellectual shallows, but these shallows are as wide as a vast ocean.

You can remove the unavailable item s now or we'll automatically remove it at Checkout. Nick Carr provides a thought-provoking and intellectually courageous account of how the medium of the Internet is changing the way we think now and how future generations will or will not think. Michael Lewis. The technologies we use to find, store, and share information can literally reroute our neural pathways.