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THE ESSENTIAL RUMI EBOOK

Wednesday, September 4, 2019


The Essential Rumi r. Translated by with. COLEMAN BARKS. JOHN MOYNE. A. J . ARBERRY. REYNOLD NICHOLSON. CASTLE BOOKS. Editorial Reviews. Review. If Rumi is the most-read poet in America today, Coleman Barks is in download a Kindle Kindle eBooks Kindle Unlimited Prime Reading Best Sellers & More Kindle Book Deals Free Reading Apps Kindle Singles. Rumi. Similar Free eBooks Rumi: The Book of Love - Poems of Ecstasy and Longing Is Forbidden' from The Essential Rumi, translations by Coleman Barks .


The Essential Rumi Ebook

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This revised and expanded edition of The Essential Rumi includes a new introduction by Coleman Barks and more than 80 never-before-published poems. Read "The Essential Rumi - reissue New Expanded Edition" by Coleman Barks available from Rakuten Kobo. Sign up today and get $5 off your first download. The Essential Rumi ~". Translated by COL EMAN BAR KS with JOHN MOYNE. A. J. ARBERRY. REYNOLD NICHOLSON o 5. CASTLE BOOKS.

Reality keeps the sky turned over like a cup above us, revolving. Who turns the sky wheel? The universal intelligence.

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The soul is here for its own joy. A head has one use: for loving a true love. Legs: to run after. Love is for vanishing into the sky. The mind, for learning what men have done and tried to do. Mysteries are not to be solved. The eye goes blind when it only wants to see why. Every morning a new arrival. A joy, a depression, a meanness, some momentary awareness comes Welcome and entertain them all!

Even if they're a crowd of sorrows, who violently sweep your house empty of its furniture, still, treat each guest honorably. He may be clearing you out for some new delight. The dark thought, the shame, the malice, meet them at the door laughing, and invite them in. Be grateful for whoever comes, because each has been sent as a guide from beyond.

Only a sleeper considers it real. Then death comes like dawn, and you wake up laughing at what you thought was your grief. Because the soul has been so afflicted so that it might become strong, and I am thankful for each moment. View all 12 comments. Make way, make way! Currently, I am ruminantly ruminating Rumi's ruminative ruminations in the loo. And I guess I'll have to stay in here for a number of days And deary, please, could you give me more loo papers?

I try to stay just above the surface, yet I'm already under and living within the ocean. Your enemies love the dark. A spider weaves a web over a light, out of himself, or herself, makes a veil. It fills.

Going back to a simpler self gives wisdom. Freedom, or power over an entire nation? A little while alone in your room will prove more valuable than anything else that could ever be given you. Darkness is your candle. Your boundaries are your quest. Very feeble.

Reality keeps the sky turned over like a cup above us, revolving. Who turns the sky wheel? The universal intelligence. The soul is here for its own joy. A head has one use: Love is for vanishing into the sky. The mind, for learning what men have done and tried to do. Mysteries are not to be solved.

The eye goes blind when it only wants to see why. Every morning a new arrival. A joy, a depression, a meanness, some momentary awareness comes as an unexpected visitor. Welcome and entertain them all! Even if they're a crowd of sorrows, who violently sweep your house empty of its furniture, still, treat each guest honorably. He may be clearing you out for some new delight. The dark thought, the shame, the malice, meet them at the door laughing, and invite them in.

Be grateful for whoever comes, because each has been sent as a guide from beyond. Only a sleeper considers it real. Then death comes like dawn, and you wake up laughing at what you thought was your grief. But there's a difference with this dream. Everything cruel and unconscious done in the illusion of the present world, all that does not fade away at the death-waking.

It stays, and it must be interpreted. Expecting the worst, you look, and instead, here's the joyful face you've been wanting to see. Your hand opens and closes and opens and closes. If it were always a fist or always stretched open, you would be paralyzed. Your deepest presence is in every small contracting and expanding, the two as beautifully balanced and coordinated as birdwings. View all 38 comments.

I learn something new every time I open this book. The image that sticks to mind if how we should try to emulate a reed flute and let God's breath flow through us.

I've stopped being religious when I stopped going to church when I was 16 but reading Rumi's writings is probably the closest I am to religion right now. View all 4 comments. Jan 07, claire rated it it was amazing. This is always by my bed--when I haven't returned it to the library again--because it gracefully and fiercely reminds me of what it means to be alive, to long for truth and love, to open my heart again and again even when the wind is blowing wickedly all around me.

I don't even, I can't even dare review this. It is beyond me. View all 5 comments. May 23, Yelda Basar Moers rated it it was amazing Shelves: A phenomenal read! This book of poetry by the gifted Coleman Barks has become one of my bibles of spirituality-- it is what I would call a one in a million read!

I've added it to Thoreau's Walden and the holy books. The artistry and tapestry of language is unparalleled. The words of Rumi come alive under the care of Barks. It is impossible not to be moved by Rumi's words in this compilation.

If the universe could speak, this is what it would say. Highly recommended! View all 7 comments. It almost seems impossible, unbearable to only reward it with three stars. Parts of it gently touched my soul, and reading those few lines of pure beauty, almost felt revolutionary.

Rumi is mostly known for his love poems, and I can clearly see why. There's a certain hint of unision and belonging in his great visions of love and he strings his words together in such a delicate serenity. I fell in love with his idea of love. However there were uninteresting parts as well and I skipped a few long poems along the way. Some of it felt too religious, too spiritual for my simple want of beautiful words. Some of Rumi's metaphors felt weak and insufficient, some of his musings were too repetitive.

Good parts and bad parts. The three stars both resemble divine inspiration and repetitive boredom. That is why I am so ambivalent about it. How do they learn it? They fall, and falling, they're given wings. View all 3 comments. Jan 17, B. Rinehart rated it it was amazing Shelves: Skin, blood, bone, brain, and soul. There's no room for lack of trust, or trust.

Nothing in this existence but that existence. I wanted to savor it like fine wine. This book is an anthology of the theologian, jurist and mystic known as "The Roman" despite being born in Afghanistan and writing mostly in Persian though he did live in the former Eastern Roman Empire for much of his life.

This book is controversially tr " I am filled with you. This book is controversially translated by Coleman Barks who opted for a poetic translation instead of a literal one.

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This often comes up when translating poetry. I remember seeing this same controversy over english translations of The Divine Comedy. With Dante, I elected for a poetic translation and I do so here. Even with Barks' filter, the thesis is still Rumi's. I will not waste too much time feebly trying to describe this book, but I feel obligated to say a few words. This book displays the heights of Sufism in the Middle Ages and the descriptions of sensual, erotic, neo-platonic, and divine love in this collection is staggering.

Rumi is not some ancient hippie poet, but he keeps his faith and his interpretaiton of it as the key to fully understanding his poetry. I offer here, for instance, my favorite of the bunch, " The Question ": I haven't seen anything. But for the sake of conversation, I'll tell you a story. God's presence is there in front of me, a fire on the left, a lovely stream on the right.

One group walks towards the fire, into the fire, another toward the sweet flowing water. No one knows which are blessed and which not.

Whoever walks into the fire appears suddenly in the stream. A head goes under on the water surface, that head pokes out of the fire. Most people guard against going into the fire, and so end up in it. Those who love the water of pleasure and make it their devotion are cheated with this reversal. The trickery goes further. The voice of the fire tells the truth saying, I am not fire. I am fountainhed.

Coleman-Barks-The-Essential-Rumi

Come into me and don't mind the sparks. If you are a friend of God, fire is your water. You should wish to have a hundred thousand sets of mothwings, so you could burn them away, one set a night. The moth sees light and goes into the fire. You should see fire and go toward the light. Fire is what of God is world-consuming. Water, world-protecting.

Somehow each gives the appearance of the other. To these eyes you have now, what looks like water burns. What looks like fire is a great relief to be inside. You've seen a magician make a bowl of rice seem a dish full of tiny live worms. Before an assembly with one breath he made a floor swarm with scorpions that weren't there. How much more amazing God's tricks. Generation after generation lies down defeated, they think, but they're like a woman underneath a man, circling him.

One molecule-mote-second thinking of God's reversal of comfort and pain is better than attending any ritual.

That splinter of intelligence is substance. The fire and water themselves: Accidental, done with mirrors. Though he spent his life mostly as an Islamic jurist and theologian positions he inherited from his father , it was not until he met a traveling mystic named Shams of Tabriz that his transformation into Sufi devotee and master happened. When Shams was killed by Rumi's jealous students, his career as poet and dervish began and it has been his claim to fame for over years.

For Rumi Shams did not die, but became whole. Rumi would spend the rest of his life trying to become whole as well. An Egypt That Doesn't Exist: I keep secret in myself an Egypt that does not exist.

Is that good or bad? I don't know. For years I gave away sexual love with my eyes. Now I don't. I am not in any one place. I do not have a name for what I give away. Whatever Shams gave, that you can have from me.

View all 9 comments. Jan 30, Astha Vyas rated it it was amazing Shelves: When you read Rumi, a sudden mystical fog wraps you and teleports you to places unknown; places where you long to go. This book gives you the most basic ideas of life with subtle hints and hard hitting thoughts.

You might disagree with Rumi on certain points, but never you 'll discard his teachings all together; as his expression is so beautiful that it is impossible not to admire. Indeed, it is "The Essential Rumi".

Sep 21, Kurt rated it it was amazing. This is a book I return to again and again. I play a game with this book I will concentrate on a problem or a situation, then open the book randomly to a page and start reading; something in the poem that I selected will have some relevance to the thought at hand.

Of course, it has to do with my interpretation of the situation, but it always lends itself to deeper thought, or it will allow me to be able to gain some fresh insight into the problem. Basically, Rumi I Ching. The translations of t This is a book I return to again and again. The translations of these poems is fairly astounding, because I think that they are done in a way that is not at all literal, but somehow maintains the essence of the beauty of Rumi's devotion and longing.

It makes me wish I could read these in their original language.

So, in short, it is a personal book for me. I don't consider myself a religious person, but I can relate to a key metaphor in Sufism, that of the Ney reed flute used in playing Dervish devotional music; the reed used to make the Ney is cut from the bed, so the music played through it, with the breath, incidentally, is music of the reed longing to return to its origin.

So it is with the musician who plays. His soul also longs to return to its origin. These are devotional poems, but the meaning and interpretations lend themselves to human understanding, of ourselves, and others.

We all need help.

This book helps me. Feb 24, Jamie clare rated it it was amazing. Who Says Words with my Mouth? All day I think about it, then at night I say it. Where did I come from, and what am I supposed to be doing? I have no idea. My soul is from elsewhere, I'm sure of that, and I intend to end up there. This drunkenness began in some other tavern. When I get back around to that place, I'll be completely sober. Meanwhile, I'm like a bird from another continent, sitting in this aviary.

The day is coming when I fly off, but who is it now in my ear who hears my voice? Who says words with my mouth? Who looks out with my eyes? What is the soul? I cannot stop asking. If I could taste one sip of an answer, I could break out of this prison for drunks.

I didn't come here of my own accord, and I can't leave that way. Whoever brought me here will have to take me home. This poetry. I never know what I'm going to say. I don't plan it. When I'm outside the saying of it, I get very quiet and rarely speak at all. View 1 comment. Jan 28, Colin Kinlund rated it it was amazing. And yet somehow the reverse effect is also true, in which the entirety of the mystic and divine collected in these pages is reflected in every word.

Rumi writes: You that love lovers, this is your home. Nov 20, Trish rated it it was amazing Shelves: Dec 02, Iwona rated it it was amazing.

Be grateful for whoever come "The Guest House" This being human is a guest house. Aug 15, Sarah rated it it was amazing. The has to be my second favorite book of poetry. Rumi was less of a poet I believe, and more a vessel of grace; the messages, parables, imagery, and lyrical quality of his work makes me think much of the Psalms.

Coleman Barks' translations are exquisite. I've read many different translations of Rumi, and none are as strong, brilliant, and seem to breathe with love as his. It seems that Barks was specifically chosen to be spoken through by this 12th century Sufi. I had the great pleasure to meet The has to be my second favorite book of poetry.

I had the great pleasure to meet him once Coleman Barks, not Rumi. He had an incredible serenity about him and an honest face. He seemed to have something that I've always wanted: The peace with comes with knowing you have absolutely nothing to be ashamed of, nothing to hide, no secrets or lies. He signed my copy of The Illuminated Rumi and told me to keep on writing my own poetry.

The Essential Rumi Revised

If you ever decide to read anything of Rumi's, I suggest you toss aside any other translator if you really want to feel the full impact of his majestic poetry. View 2 comments. Oct 15, Monty Python rated it did not like it. I was more than a little irritated at this book: Barks doesn't understand Persian and didn't translate any of Rumi's work, but he takes existing translations of Rumi and reworks them. What Barks is doing is akin to a DJ mixing someone else's remix into their own DJ set, and then trying to pass that off as the original material.

If you're going to practice that form of collage, don't market it as anything else; let the coll I was more than a little irritated at this book: If you're going to practice that form of collage, don't market it as anything else; let the collage stand as its own work.

The fact that Barks is an acolyte of Robert "strip all subtlety and sensuality from erotic works and make them blatant and hypersexed" Bly doesn't help matters either. Rumi needs no introduction, no rating, no recommendation, no stars. He is above and beyond all of this — he is a constellation unto himself.Barbara Bray.

I love Rumi. A spider weaves a web over a light, out of himself, or herself, makes a veil.

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Jenn Granneman. His soul also longs to return to its origin. Thanks for telling us about the problem. The dark thought, the shame, the malice, meet them at the door laughing, and invite them in.

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