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THE BANG BANG CLUB EBOOK

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eBook . The Bang-Bang Club was a group of four young war photographers, friends and colleagues: Ken Oosterbroek, Kevin Carter. The Bang-Bang Club (eBook). by Greg Marinovich, Joao Silva, Archbishop Desmond Tutu (Author). 89, Words; Pages. During the final, bloody days of. Read "The Bang-Bang Club Snapshots from a Hidden War" by Greg Marinovich available from Rakuten Kobo. Sign up today and get $5 off your first download.


The Bang Bang Club Ebook

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Get this from a library! The Bang-Bang Club: snapshots from a hidden war. [Greg Marinovich; João Silva] -- During the final, bloody days of South African. Editorial Reviews. yazik.info Review. Most people, upon hearing gunfire, would run away download a Kindle Kindle eBooks Kindle Unlimited Prime Reading Best Sellers & More Kindle Book Deals Free Reading Apps Kindle Singles. The Bang-Bang Club: Snapshots from a Hidden War [Greg Marinovich, Joao Silva, Archbishop Desmond Tutu] on yazik.info *FREE* shipping on qualifying.

Ken was shot by peacekeepers as South Africa was approaching its first democratic election. A very informative Book and one that I couldn't put down. Jan 14, J. This is an easy read about four photographers in South Africa who photographed the township wars between the political parties the ANC and Inkatha.

These wars occured in the early 90s as the country geared up for its first democratic elections in The book is also an interesting treatment of the moral problems associated with artists like photographers whose jobs demand that they witness people's pain but do little more than be a witness of it.

Oct 15, Lindsay rated it it was amazing. A phenomenal book. Taken from the perspective of war photographers who are there to capture the last, bloody days of Apartheid in South Africa. This book provides more than sufficient background on the history behind Apartheid, without overwhelming the reader. The toll that this conflict took on these 4 photogs and on everyday folks in South Africa is artfully presented in the bang bang club. Jan 23, Fern F rated it it was amazing. I got this at a book swap a few months ago.

I had overlooked it initially, but as we got to the end of the swap and most of the books had been picked, I read the back cover and thought "why not? And I'm so glad I did, because this book is a raw, detailed, retelling of the lives of four photographers the so called "BangBang Club" because they always seemed to show up where the bangbang, aka violence, was happening in the waning years of apartheid S.

Re I got this at a book swap a few months ago. Reading articles from war zones, it's easy to imagine just how dangerous the lives of those reporters must be. It's harder to remember that the pictures in the articles were taken by photographers that at times place themselves in harms way for the perfect shot.

The BangBang Club will never let you forget the work the photographers do and the emotional toll the work takes on them. The photographers in the BangBang Club are not great men: But they did great work that helped tell the story of a transitioning S. Africa to the rest of the world and suffered death, pain and loss for their work. Powerful narrative of South Africa's struggle from war photographers' perspective.

I bought this book last year when I visited South Africa for the first time, but I just so wish to have have read this before my visit.

The Bang Bang Club

Although I was familiar with Kevin Carter's photo of a Sudanese child with a vulture in the background, which was also brought up in one of the lectures I have taken at university, I now feel that the photo shan't be discussed without taking this book into account. May 08, De Wet rated it really liked it. Not always an easy read as it contains graphic descriptions of violence and of course the photos to go along with it.

Mar 16, Violet rated it liked it Shelves: I took a visual journalism class at Boston University with Greg Marinovich last year. All I knew what was in front of me: He was personable yet encouraging, pushing people to strive for things that he knew was within their I took a visual journalism class at Boston University with Greg Marinovich last year. He was personable yet encouraging, pushing people to strive for things that he knew was within their grasp. But I had no idea who he was.

I had some vague knowledge that he was a Pulitzer Prize winner but knew not why. Then a year later, my history of journalism professor assigned this book.

So I read the first chapter, and I was hooked. The writing was clear and straight forward, not terrific he is a photographer not a writer after all , but the events were engaging enough to retain my attention. They tell of the time between and as Marinovich and others covered the Hostel Wars in South Africa. Really there are two stories contained within these pages: The Bang-Bang Club refers to a group of photojournalists that made their name covering the conflict that sparked around the time Apartheid ended, also known as the Hostel Wars.

It was a complicated battle, full of propaganda as well as various tribal, political, and racial divides that can be hard to understand even to South Africans. It was interesting, if a bit repetitive. Sure, they mention apartheid and how bad it was, but they never really explain the complex conflicts surrounding it. In a way, the inclusion of the explanation of the fighting is more of a history lesson than a rundown of the context that the photojournalists were working in.

The other part of the book of course follows Marinovich and the others of the Bang-Bang Club as they develop as photojournalists, win awards, make friends, and struggle with the effects of covering a very ruthless conflict. I mean, when a person is tasked with documenting events, what are they supposed to do when a man is burning or a child is starving in front of them? This struggle to justify their actions affects each in the Bang-Bang Club in different ways, from mild depression all the way to suicide.

What do I say to someone who is such a good photojournalist that his talent intimidates me? What do I say to someone who has seen and experience all that crap? I guess I just have to keep reminding myself that really nothing has changed.

Regardless of what happened in the past, he is still the same fantastic instructor that I had last year. May 13, Gavin rated it it was amazing.

This one is pretty rough, but very worth the time. Told by those who lived it, it's the story of the group of photographers that became internationally recognized for their photos of war torn Africa, primarily the unrest leading to the eventual end of apartheid in South Africa. We've all seen their photos of starving children, of mobs burning men alive. The emotional baggage on all of them is tremendous and no This one is pretty rough, but very worth the time.

The emotional baggage on all of them is tremendous and not to be overcome by all. Drug use, suicide, and job hazards thin their ranks and leave the two co-authors in the wake to pull the pieces together and move on. It's certainly troubling, the idea of photographing death without effort toward intervention. Eventually I realized that these guys are soldiers of war who carry cameras instead of guns. They're doing a job and serving a purpose based on violent conflict.

It can be argued that the widespread publication of their photos actually helped turn the tide against apartheid, so their efforts can't be dismissed as those of exploitative adrenaline junkies. They served their country and some of them paid the ultimate price.

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It's hard to imagine and at times hard to read, but it's a great book. Mar 03, Linda Watkins rated it really liked it. It is an appaling remembering of the time 4 conflict photographers spent in South Africa during the time that apartheid was coming to a violent end, as well as time spent in Sudan. Two of the 4 received Pulitzers for their photos. It isn't your job to help.

It is your job to record. I remember at the time, when I saw that photo, thinking Did he take the little kid to a feeding station? What happened to the little kid? The toll was heavy of these four personally. A brutal, visceral and disturbing ride through the last days of apartheid South Africa. I loved it.

Even though Marinovich is not an experienced writer, as can be seen through some less than fortunate passages, the style of the book is nonetheless incredibly engaging.

Apart from the unfortunate in medias res beginning, which gives the chaotic impression that one needs to be intimately familiar with the conflict and its different groupings, this book gives anyone a tough to put down introduction A brutal, visceral and disturbing ride through the last days of apartheid South Africa. Apart from the unfortunate in medias res beginning, which gives the chaotic impression that one needs to be intimately familiar with the conflict and its different groupings, this book gives anyone a tough to put down introduction to a bloody part of modern history.

Sep 03, Chris rated it it was amazing. I'm not going to say that this is the definitive insight into the transition between apartheid South Africa and universal suffrage in South Africa because I have done nothing that qualifies me to say that. But this book is written by a man who photographed, felt and lived those years.

And with that qualification makes it very very worth reading. Jul 17, Hannah fullybookedreviews rated it liked it Shelves: Review to follow. Jun 09, Niel Vaughan rated it really liked it.

The Bang-Bang Club : snapshots from a hidden war

An honest account of addiction to adrenalin, drugs, egos and the truth. Jun 26, Kathy rated it really liked it. This is a compelling book that I highly recommend; however, readers should be prepared for stark reality of how horrible humans can treat each other. It is a powerful book about the end of apartheid in South Africa; but as with most changes it came at a great cost to human life. In addition this book gives the reader a small understanding of the work done by photojournalists.

I say a "small" understanding because I think it is impossible for outsiders to understand what makes men and women choos This is a compelling book that I highly recommend; however, readers should be prepared for stark reality of how horrible humans can treat each other. I say a "small" understanding because I think it is impossible for outsiders to understand what makes men and women choose to put themselves in the midst of shooting and violence armed with nothing but a camera.

But a picture truly is the most powerful form of communication, and we should be thankful that these people put themselves in such danger so we can better understand the events that are happening in our world. These photojournalists also go through much emotional soul searching, and the scenes that they are photographing have a profound impact on them. The author does a good job of writing about his experiences, but I still was unable to follow all the different groups and the time line.

However, I think this was due to the complexity of the "silent war" and not really his writing. Feb 14, Hilary Shearing rated it it was amazing. This is a tough book, as you would expect, given the subject. The sum total as a primary source, provides a compelling insight into the psychological effect of warfare, that is both personal and general. The Bang Bang Club brings behind-the-scenes turmoil to centre stage.

Here we confront many uncomfortable truths - the overpowering adrenaline rush being one of them - which enables photographers to place themselves in the most dangerous of situations, frequently alongside mobs, whose own adrenali This is a tough book, as you would expect, given the subject.

Here we confront many uncomfortable truths - the overpowering adrenaline rush being one of them - which enables photographers to place themselves in the most dangerous of situations, frequently alongside mobs, whose own adrenalin rush enables them to commit acts of the most barbarous and frenzied violence.

A must read, The Bang Bang Club remains as much about now as about then. A quick glance at "Reporters without borders" is a sobering reminder of the constant dangers photographers and journalists face in keeping the "public" informed. February - so far, 3 journalists have been killed, are imprisoned along with 15 media assistants. This is definitely the best documentary book I've ever read, and the toughest though.

It required a lot of mental strength for me to get through it, but it's so interesting you just can't stop half way. All in all, after days of living inside "Bang Bang club", the brain doesn't want to believe that humans are worse than animals, but apparently it's time to accept the truth. Also as I wanted to become a war-journalist, it was even more interesting to read about the world I've "betrayed" by choosing This is definitely the best documentary book I've ever read, and the toughest though.

Also as I wanted to become a war-journalist, it was even more interesting to read about the world I've "betrayed" by choosing another carrier.

It is a very powerful and painfully honest story of people who risk their lives for years to show the society the war others can't understand. Heartbreaking and extraordinary. Sometimes you get too close c Technically a reread, as I also read this in , when I first moved to Cape Town. It's even better the second time through. The exploration of what motivates combat journalists and photographers, and what their ethical responsibilities are, is invaluable.

I'd recommend this to everyone, sad as it is -- Technically a reread, as I also read this in , when I first moved to Cape Town. I'd recommend this to everyone, sad as it is -- and it is gut wrenching. Oh, and it's five stars for content; the prose is very workmanlike, but the story transcends the telling of it. Jun 25, Lakshmi rated it really liked it. The book is an eye opener on so many topics and issues to warrant a must-read emphasis.

It is difficult to think how often conflict pictures have moved each of us and yet how often have we paused to think about the lives of those who capture these images? What tales they have to tell, what sights they have seen and what moral dilemnas have they grappled with? At another level, the book is an easy read into the world of apartheid in South Africa - not a documentary, not a fiction but a reality tha The book is an eye opener on so many topics and issues to warrant a must-read emphasis.

At another level, the book is an easy read into the world of apartheid in South Africa - not a documentary, not a fiction but a reality that may well be more difficult to accept than had it been just some imagination. Jul 28, Ayan Roy Choudhury rated it really liked it. Really enjoyed this book and about the inner struggle of the characters, and the decisions they took in their extreme situations.

Aug 02, Sigrid rated it it was amazing Shelves: I can't really say that I enjoyed reading this I cried a bunch of times and I definitely would not recommend reading it right before bed. However, I would recommend reading it literally any other time. I felt such empathy for the people the book was about and I learned so much about politics, history, industry, war, trauma, and photography.

I feel attached to everything about this book. Nov 17, Bothma van Tonder rated it it was amazing. This is one of the few books that I have taken the time to read more than once, actually a couple of times. Definitely one of my favorite books of all time. There is a brilliant balance between the focus on the political turmoil of the era and the lives of the four photographers. The book maintains a strong factual aspect, but unlike some non fiction, I really identified with the characters.

Aug 02, Jason rated it liked it Shelves: This book truly gives insight into the world of conflict photography in a raw, matter of fact way. If war photography is a genre in which you're interested then this book is well worth the read.

A name I would point out not of there own coshing but one given to them by a fellow journalist. Going into this book I knew little of apartheid and the events that took place in South Africa in the early nineties. What led me to read this book was a picture that many people have seen the world over. One that had haunted me ever since I had seen it many years ago.

It wasn't however until recently that I discovered the man who took the photograph had committed suicide not long after winning an award for it. I started to do some research about Kevin Carter and the photo he had taken this, in turn, lead me to the small group of South Africans photographers who had risked everything to show the world a conflict that was tearing the country apart.

As the book start the author threw me in at the deep end with an inability to swim in these unfamiliar waters. Within moments Greg and a fellow photograph Ken Oosterbroek are lying shot on a township street in the middle of a gunfight between peacekeepers and local opposition fighters.

It defiantly grabbed my attention. But while they describe the scene in intense detail little context is given. It is only as I moved forward through the book and back in time did it reveal the incredible story of how these two men and the rest of the little club came to be there on that fateful day.

Primarily this is a book about a ragtag group of people who were using old cameras to try and capture a pivotal moment in their countries history. Between the two authors, they manage to give an unflinching account of their time leading up to the election that would end apartheid.

While the style of the book is easy to read the subject matter for me was definitely not.

Bang-Bang Club

There where a couple of time I had to put the book down just to take a break from the scenes that were being shown to me. The photos they captured would change the way the world saw South Africa. In the process of getting these photos there, actions seemed at times to verge on insanity. But for the most part none of them could let go of the job they had chosen to take on addicted to the hunt for the next image.

But like all junkies, they also suffered the side effects of their dangerous habit.However, formatting rules can vary widely between applications and fields of interest or study. Puffin Ladybird. But while they describe the scene in intense detail little context is given.

I felt such empathy for the people the book was about and I learned so much about politics, history, industry, war, trauma, and photography. Sep 11, Kang-Chun Cheng rated it it was amazing. The photographers in the BangBang Club are not great men: Nov 11, Russ rated it really liked it The sentence that best summarizes this poignant read for me is from page , "Good pictures. Kristin Hannah. Here we confront many uncomfortable truths - the overpowering adrenaline rush being one of them - which enables photographers to place themselves in the most dangerous of situations, frequently alongside mobs, whose own adrenalin rush enables them to commit acts of the most barbarous and frenzied violence.

Me Before You.