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MALAZAN BOOK OF THE FALLEN EBOOK

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The Complete Malazan Book Of The Fallen. Identifier TheCompleteMalazanBookOfTheFallenStevenE. Identifier-arkark:// t86j01r Here are all 10 books in The Malazan Book of the Fallen series. Enjoy. All ten volumes of New York Times bestselling author Steven Erikson's epic fantasy series featuring vast legions of gods, mages, humans, and dragons battling.


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Read "The Complete Malazan Book of the Fallen" by Steven Erikson available from Rakuten Kobo. Sign up today and get $5 off your first download. All ten. Malazan Book of the Fallen has 37 entries in the series. Tor Books is excited to announce The Complete Malazan Book of the Fallen, an ebook-only bundle of all ten books in the main Malazan Book.

New readers: Move away from this reading order and start with nothing else but Gardens of the Moon, first book in Malazan Book of the Fallen series and then continue onward by the order books were published.

If you like puzzles, you'll like this suggested chronological reading order. Various parts of history are scattered all around in unfinished trilogies and new series and whatnot. And you get to collect them, all the way to crescendo of Crippled God, final book of the series, and you get to see complete picture.

That's not necessarily the same picture you have seen for the first time. View all 24 comments. Aug 06, Jesse Chandler rated it it was amazing Shelves: Hands down my favorite fantasy series ever.

Be warned, at first it is confusing and seems random, but if you bear with it, you will be rewarded. A couple of key points for potential readers: Many readers complain that the writing is sub par at first glance, but it isn't, it only seems so until you realize that Erikson rarely wastes words, and pretty much anything on the page is relevant, you just may not realize it yet.

Never is a character's personality spelled out. They must be judged by the reader through their actions. A character may muse on another character's qualities, but realize that every character is fallible, never take a point of view for granted.

Many characters can be introspective, sometimes to the point where a reader may want to skip, but there are often profound repercussions on the character's actions, and characters will even seem to be acting paradoxically to their thoughts, but consider actual people, and then realize that Erikson is a genius.

I am serious when I say that while a character's thoughts may give you some insight, like real people, actions speak louder than words. Even in my third reread of the series I found pieces that I missed, changing my whole view of related events. View 2 comments. Feb 17, Julio Genao added it. View all 10 comments. Jul 19, Ishan Goyal rated it it was amazing. Steven Erikson, in his Malazan Book of the Fallen, a series stretching to 10 books and pages, has created an essentially unknowable world into which viewers are allowed intermittent flashes.

He does not invite you to take a journey alongside him, but throws a challenge to stay abreast and only the worthy shall pass, but for those who persist, an experience of a lifetime awaits. Imagine a world replete with a multitude of races, civilizations, realms, gods and magic systems and being thrust i Steven Erikson, in his Malazan Book of the Fallen, a series stretching to 10 books and pages, has created an essentially unknowable world into which viewers are allowed intermittent flashes.

Imagine a world replete with a multitude of races, civilizations, realms, gods and magic systems and being thrust into it to fend for yourself as you go along.

But there is a pantheon of memorable characters each of who is allowed a thread in a very complex weave. There is no clear battle lines between good and evil. Even the mortality of humans, the divinity of gods and the difference between life and death is not black and white but one enormous gray and the darkest characters are given motivations that you can not only comprehend but actually sympathize with.

The sheer verbosity of several characters and the conversations between some epic duos is like a ballet with all its elegance and finesse. The philosophy behind the seemingly carelessly thrown around words, should have been a matter of pride for a whole school of thought, never mind an individual person.

The series combines the world building of 'A Wheel of Time', the sense of reality of 'A Song of Ice and Fire' and the epic quality of 'A Dark Tower' and then exceeds them all in every aspect in such a manner to stand all on its own.

It may never have the following or fame associated with some of the other fantasy series. It might not even be my personal favorite for the sheer effort it demands of the reader but there is no denying that the author has managed to deliver a work which has taken the genre to a whole different level. Oct 27, Seb rated it it was ok. It's with a heavy heart that I write this review. As a little background, I finished reading the Wheel of Time my favourite piece of work and was seeking an equally epic saga to fill the void that was left behind.

After much research, it seemed that the consensus around the internet was that The Malazan Book of the Fallen was the way to go. It was touted as a harder read but ultimately just as satisfying as WoT, if not more so. So with hope and excited anticipation, in I jumped.

The first book w It's with a heavy heart that I write this review. The first book was hard going as expected, with a myriad of characters and themes introduced but I happily turned page after page, in full confidence that all the vague references and convoluted connections would iron themselves out over time as they tend to do. A slight alarm bell did ring - it seemed that far less was resolved within the first book than I was used to, but again, I chalked this down to the fact that this was meant to be a more challenging read and therefore to be expected.

Book 2 was worse and I frequently found myself frustrated at the pace of writing and the focus on seemingly meaningless scenes, internal monologues and themes.

Again, I ignored my gut and ploughed on in confidence. Before talking about how the rest of the books started to pan out, I'll add a note here on Erikson's style in this saga at least.

A great deal of the material is written as internal character monologues. Which of course, any fantasy reader would be used to. What is different is how these characters are often not musing about anything concrete - e.

Rather, they muse in a very abstract way and the reader has to put a LOT of effort in to deduce how this relates to anything else in the book. I suspect that it often isn't meant to link to anything per se, but to reveal to the reader the inner psyche of these characters. Now that may not sound daunting to you, but when pretty much ALL internal monologues are of this nature and worse, seem to follow the same theme of "my life is awful; life is meaningless; what's the point in anything", it starts to get pretty wearying.

Onto Book 3 - here, the pace seemed to pick up and I became excited. Actually, Book 3 is probably my favourite of the 9 I've read. There was less of what I talked about above, and more tangible inner monologues, decisive action and clear meaningful character development.

Book 4 introduced more characters, but some were interesting and seemed to be important and the book was written in the style of Book 3 so I was a happy bunny. Book 5 seemed to take another tack yet again, but I persevered. Book 6 - a mixed bag, but more good than bad and I started to guess at the direction of the series.

Maybe that's because I'm a simple minded reader and I like to know the direction I'm heading in, but if you're like me, you will probably be frustrated for that reason too. Book 7 is where things really started to go wrong - very wrong - for me personally.

The Complete Malazan Book of the Fallen

Books 7, 8 and 9 were 3, odd pages of what I disliked most about the series: And that was for the main characters. Add to that the fact that you're often following class C and below characters and it becomes a chore rather than a joy to pick up the books. Something kept me going - namely, a faith in all the people on the web that had recommended this series, a faith that it just had to turn around and build to an exciting climax.

My faith was not rewarded. By Book 9, you'd expect the build up to be exciting and gripping. It's not. So now, with just 1.

I get that some people may like this style honestly, I can't fathom how, but difference of opinion is what makes the world wonderful after all , but for anyone like me who likes a more traditional build up of characters and themes throughout a series, this is NOT FOR YOU. To anyone in the middle of the series who is of a similar mindset to me but has been encouraged by Books 3 and 4 possibly 5 , let me stress that Books will leave you feeling disappointed and angry.

I really, really wanted to like this series and to recommend it to others. But I can't; I just can't. View 1 comment. Una saga epic fantasy che ha conquistato uno stuolo di lettori in tutto il mondo, eccovi spiegati in maniera sintetica ed efficace pregi e difetti. Definetely 5 stars, maybe more. An unconventional, smart, complex, titanic in scale fantasy Epic, spanning two empires, four continents and countless characters, from street urchins and soldiers to Gods and Primordial powers. It is mostly arcane, with the writer offering very little clarifications, instead it tells you all you need to know through half-told words, stories and excerpts from texts, often answering questions books before they come up in the story.

This can sometimes be frustrating e Definetely 5 stars, maybe more. This can sometimes be frustrating even towards the ending some fundamental answers are left unsaid even though they are revealed in little scenes but also it is very rewarding when the answer dawns on you. The prose is okeyish and gets better but nothing impressive.

My pet peeve is the fact that every character philosophises all the time, often making reading the book a burden. But soldiering through gets rewarded with some of the most EPIC scenes in the fantasy genre. The conclusion to the Chain of Dogs from deadhouse gates must be the best scene in the entire genre. Overall, a real classic series aimed at people who have read quite a bit of fantasy and want something off the beaten track.

A true epic narrative for all fantasy fans willing to ignore the non-linear plot, the tons of characters that philosofise all the time and the lack of clear explenations in order to read the most original and grand scale fantasy series out there Sep 14, Dan Becker rated it it was amazing. The Malazan Book of the Fallen is one of the greatest epic fantasies of all time.

Grim, beautiful, anguished, hopeful, brutal, hilarious, and more. Characters so vivid they live beyond the pages. Triumphs and tragedies - sometimes one and the same. All told with wonderful writing. The scope and scale makes Game of Thrones which I enjoy seem parochial and lightweight. The Malazan tales may not be for everyone.

There are horrible things in them - you've been warned. But they are handled very, very well. It is all redeemed. Nov 27, Filip rated it it was amazing. By this. Jul 21, Javin Goyal rated it it was amazing. They are the things you get ashamed of, because words diminish them -- words shrink things that seemed limitless when they were in your head to no more than living size when they're brought out.

But it's more than that, isn't it? The most important things lie too close to wherever your secret heart is buried, like landmarks to a treasure your enemies would love to steal away. And you may make revelations that cost you dearly only to have people look at you in a funny way, not understanding what you've said at all, or why you thought it was so important that you almost cried while you were saying it.

That's the worst, I think. When the secret stays locked within not for want of a teller but for want of an understanding ear. But, I'll try anyway.

Malazan Book of the Fallen

To begin with, nobody recommended me this book. No one I knew had ever read it. Just found it on goodreads and the premise looked interesting. Actual gods warring with each other in a world filled with mortals. Also, I was really amused by the number of reviews that had an edit saying that after the first reread the series was so much better. I never had the slightest bit of problem in understanding Inception. Thought it would be something similar here.

You are just put into this foreign world with gods walking and its own unique magic system and its own history without any information or background whatsoever. You are always catching up, trying to make the barest sense of it all, just to remain in the story. I had never experienced such a writing style before. Here, there was no single protagonist. And some of the characters we were following were millennia old and were making grandiose schemes, all the while not bothering to explain anything.

The number of characters Harry Potter has a fair number of characters. But, it was still possible to remember them all. Wheel of Time took it a step further. There was a huge amount of characters spread across various nations and groups. And, more than that each of these nations or group was a microcosm in itself with its own individual history, politics, culture and traditions. MBOTF is not on any radar in terms of the number of characters. The number of species, maybe! Humans were preceeded by atleast 4 distinct Elder Species.

And then there are so many Peoples. Some having millennia of history and their own realms and rivalries and of course their own gods.

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To ensure that it is all incomprehensible, the author even threw in inter species breeding creating their own mixed blood species or peoples. Also note that while humans have the normal life span, some of the individuals of these species have a normal lifespan of millennia, while some characters may be immortal altogether.

In fact, one of the prologues begins with a heading similar to this , years before this particular event! And some of the characters present there are still alive and kicking! The complex story line If all of this was not confusing enough. The series broadly follows story lines on three distinct continents.

So, if one were to somehow finish GoTM and still feel confident enough to begin the second one, he would be sorely disappointed. None of the characters from GoTM make it to the second one, as it follows the second continent and the characters present there. There are again a ton of new characters, a complex story with no explained background. The second book has an insane ending and you just want to read more.

Sadly, the third novel follows the first one and not the second. The second is followed by the fourth one in the series. And, now you are almost at the halfway mark and are about to begin the fifth novel. Sadly, the nightmare has returned with none of the characters in the previous four novels making it to the fifth one which takes place entirely on the third continent.

Entirely new characters, new Peoples, etc. These three story lines start merging from the sixth one. That does not mean new characters stop getting added. Now, each novel has roughly only the cast of the HP series added every novel from the sixth one. Still not daunted? That is only the opinion of that particular character. It may or may not be true. Always take it with a grain of salt. In fact, a particular series of events may look entirely different from the POVs of different characters. Interestingly, one of the most important characters in the entire series does not get even a single POV lest we may start to get the right idea about things.

Complex magic system The series has a very complex magic system that is difficult to explain even after completing the series. Also, Gods are not as powerful or invulnerable as one might think. Gods get taken down and sometimes new gods take their place in the pantheon. None of the points mentioned above are meant to dissuade you from reading it. The sheer scope of the story If the number of species or people or years were not enough, the story does not take place in a single world.

You may suddenly find yourself on a planet that has two moons or five suns! The story encompasses realms! Also, just think about a character that has lived for a hundred thousand years, all of them eventful. The entire human history covers just the last years. Think about how many civilizations and empires that person would have seen rise and fall.

He would have seen empires built upon the ruins of others only to be grounded to dust again. Here is where Erikson brings his archaeology aspect to the fore by actually making the reader realize the weight of history and the enormity of time. Shades of grey It would be wrong to say that there are no black and white characters in this book. Many characters in this book are pure evil while a few are pure gold. But, have you even begin to wonder what a dementor feels or thinks?

Or a trolloc or the orcs of the Lord of the Rings. There is a demon in the first novel that only gets a couple of lines.

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But, you remember him for the rest of the books. There are a couple of demons who feel homesick and are farmers in their world. Erikson manages to flesh out a character more in a couple of lines that other authors may not be able to do in entire novels. Even the big bad villains are not pure evil. He does something far more difficult. He makes you empathise with them and understand their motives.

The sheer epicness The first major scene of the first novel starts with a siege being laid to a city which is defended by a city-sized flying castle. He can do it just as easily with mere mortals. Schools of thought An author is considered pretty successful if he is able to fully explore, define and articulate one school of thought in his career.

Erikson tosses out these schools of thought, each more profound than the last, like chips at a poker game. Many of his later novels in the series are in fact criticized for being very heavy in philosophy. Erikson also deals with many contemporary themes that one can relate to, from the costs that human exact upon their surroundings to the apathy that comes with civilization to the pitfalls of a nation built seeing only money as value.

Themes explored Although, the book series belong to the epic war fantasy genre, it explores a variety of themes. From handling complex plots and plans that may have hatched by literal gods and may have been hundreds of thousands of years in making, to handling the most basic of all themes like courage, duty, friendship, love and compassion.

There will be sections which will seem to be tailor made for the world we live in today exploring contemporary themes. The series also actually treats all its characters equally, irrespective of race, religion and gender. The series does not shy away from asking religious, ethical, moral or metaphysical questions. While at some places, this series will surely make you cry or look away in horror, many big sections are actually comic in nature.

Characters It may not be wrong to say that one of the biggest strengths of the series are its characters.

Having a humongous cast, hundreds of characters have been fleshed out clearly while thousands have been touched upon. These characters, which may include immortals, gods, soldiers or the common man walking on the street, have their own histories, agendas, motivations, moral compass and reasons for doing various things. Plus, this series has the most amazing duos! There are so many! You will laugh and cry at these duos as well as love them with all your heart.

To summarize this huge review, I would like to reiterate that those earlier points are not critical in nature, but were meant to inform you how daunting it is to read this series. It is not to be taken lightly as it will consume a huge amount of your time, energy as well as mind.

I did read the series again and it was a lot more comprehensible and rewarding the second time around. But, it does deliver spectacularly! Making it all worth it and more. Dec 15, Sean Leblanc is currently reading it. I originally read the first eight books in this series as they came out.

Psyched to be reading this series again, in one complete collection no less! As there are a total of ten books, however, I will update this review as I go We learn exactly who and what the Malazan Empire is; we're even given a small glance at the I originally read the first eight books in this series as they came out. We learn exactly who and what the Malazan Empire is; we're even given a small glance at the bloody history behind it's current state.

We meet what's left of the Bridgeburners - an elite squad of the empire's old guard. We're introduced to a plethora of gods and ascendants who not only shape the world but seek to actively meddle in it as well. All in all, a pretty good start if you ask me! This first book centers around Malazan's Genebackan campaign. In an attempt to purge the last of old loyalties in a new empire, the 2nd Army - lead by Dujek One-Arm - are thrown into one impossible mission after another.

It's at this time that the Ascendants enter the fray; Shadowthrone seemingly seeks to bring down the empire with his own demented schemes while the Son of Darkness allies himself with the Empress' enemies.

Meanwhile, Oponn stirs up trouble and sows chaos. Mortals become pawns in this wicked game, but the gods will soon discover they're anything but willing.

I think what I enjoy most about Erikson and the world he's created is how refreshingly original it is. You'll not find orcs and goblins and all the rest here, but instead Tiste Andii and Jaghut and T'lann Imass among others. Also there's really no clear heroes and villians, there's just people fighting against the inevitable twists of fate - and I can definitely appreciate that.

I must say, too, that Erikson has envisioned magic - it's origin, it's use and it's effects - unlike anything else. It is the Year of Dryjhna, prophesied to be the year that the desert goddess Sha'ik raises the Whirlwind of the Apocalypse and takes back the holy Seven Cities. Seemingly all that stands in her armies' way is Fist Coltaine - once an enemy of the empire himself - and the Seventh Army, along with a handful of his Wickan clans.

Along for the ride is Duiker, a one time soldier turned Imperial historian. Meanwhile, Kalam Mekhar and Fiddler break from their fellow Bridgeburners to escort the once-possessed Apsalar back to her homeland. Of course, both men have their own reasons for this journey as well. For Kalam, it is a return to his homeland - Seven Cities, on the verge of a rebellion he finds himself pulled into. Fiddler and Apsalar, accompanied by Croakus, set out in search of the legendary Tremorlor; a journey which finds them grouped with Mappo and Icarium, both legends in their own right.

We also meet Felisin, youngest daughter of House Paran, and the outlawed historian and one time Priest of Fener known as Heboric. Their journey is of an entirely different sort - from an Imperial penal colony, through a lost and forgotten warren, and finally to the very heart of the Whirlwind of the Apocalypse. Newly outlawed Dujek One-Arm and his Host seek an uneasy alliance with old enemies - the warlord Caladan Brood and his forces - in the hopes of defeating the dreaded empire known as the Pannion Domin.

While the alliance is strained from the very beginning, it's key players manage to find friends in unexpected places all the same. The first fresh and blood Imass in over the hundred thousand years has been born into the mortal world thanks to a ritual that took place in book one and calls her undead kin to the Second Gathering.

This young woman, who houses the souls of two powerful mages and an Elder Goddess within her, finds herself in need of protection as powerful enemies set themself against her. Toc the Younger makes his return, spit from the Warren of Chaos at a place called Morn. Together, they set off on their own journey toward the Pannion Domin.

We also meet some other major players: Gruntle, a caravan guard destined to become so much more; Itkovian and the Grey Swords, an army dedicated to the god Fener; Kilava, fresh and blood sister to Onos Toolan, who defied the call of the First Gathering; and more.

And, it would seem, that all roads lead to the Pannion Domin Along the way many seek to tame him and use him, though as we learn, Karsa Orlong kneels to no one - gods or otherwise. He travels alongside Onrack the Broken and two other T'lann Imass to the Throne of the First Empire to ensure it's protection against those who seek it.

Meanwhile, Cotillion gathers agents - Crokus and Kalam Mekhar among them - to serve his purposes. Crokus travels alongside Apsalar to the island of Drift Avalii to seek another Throne in dire need of defense. Kalam, on the other hand, travels back to his homeland to reek chaos among the Army of the Apocalypse. All the while, Adjunct Tavore and her army march toward Raraku for the final showdown between the Malazan Empire and the Whirlwind goddess.

Among the Adjunct's army are some familiar faces - the newly reenlisted Fiddler as well as Gesler and Stormy We learn of Trull Sengar's tortured past, in the time before his imprisonment in the Nascent realm. The Sengar bloodline plays an integral rule in the implementation of the Edur empire, especially the youngest of brothers, Rhulad.

One is the King's Champion, one a former Sentinel betrayed by his kingdom, and the last is a seemingly destitute madman who is anything but. We also meet the undead thief Shurq Elalle and the undead child Kettle, guardian of a dying Azath house. Behind the scenes, the Crippled God continues to manipulate events in his favor It was touted as a harder read but ultimately just as satisfying as WoT, if not more so. So with hope and excited anticipation, in I jumped.

The first book w It's with a heavy heart that I write this review. The first book was hard going as expected, with a myriad of characters and themes introduced but I happily turned page after page, in full confidence that all the vague references and convoluted connections would iron themselves out over time as they tend to do.

A slight alarm bell did ring - it seemed that far less was resolved within the first book than I was used to, but again, I chalked this down to the fact that this was meant to be a more challenging read and therefore to be expected.

Book 2 was worse and I frequently found myself frustrated at the pace of writing and the focus on seemingly meaningless scenes, internal monologues and themes. Again, I ignored my gut and ploughed on in confidence. Before talking about how the rest of the books started to pan out, I'll add a note here on Erikson's style in this saga at least. A great deal of the material is written as internal character monologues.

Which of course, any fantasy reader would be used to. What is different is how these characters are often not musing about anything concrete - e.

Rather, they muse in a very abstract way and the reader has to put a LOT of effort in to deduce how this relates to anything else in the book. I suspect that it often isn't meant to link to anything per se, but to reveal to the reader the inner psyche of these characters. Now that may not sound daunting to you, but when pretty much ALL internal monologues are of this nature and worse, seem to follow the same theme of "my life is awful; life is meaningless; what's the point in anything", it starts to get pretty wearying.

Onto Book 3 - here, the pace seemed to pick up and I became excited. Actually, Book 3 is probably my favourite of the 9 I've read. There was less of what I talked about above, and more tangible inner monologues, decisive action and clear meaningful character development. Book 4 introduced more characters, but some were interesting and seemed to be important and the book was written in the style of Book 3 so I was a happy bunny.Night of Knives 2.

Book 2 was worse and I frequently found myself frustrated at the pace of writing and the focus on seemingly meaningless scenes, internal monologues and themes. Dragon Press. Something kept me going - namely, a faith in all the people on the web that had recommended this series, a faith that it just had to turn around and build to an exciting climax. Characters which veer into a single animal are called Soletaken.