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TIME MACHINE BOOK

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The Time Machine is a science fiction novella by H. G. Wells, published in and written as .. In Priest's book, a travelling salesman damages a Time Machine similar to the original, and arrives on Mars, just before the start of the invasion. The Time Machine book. Read reviews from the world's largest community for readers. “I've had a most amazing time.”The Time Machine will continu. The Time Machine. 2 of I. The Time Traveller (for so it will be convenient to speak of him) was expounding a recondite matter to us. His grey eyes shone and .


Time Machine Book

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Written by visionary H. G. Wells in , The Time Machine is the seminal time travel spawned an entire genre of fiction and having inspired thousands of books. The Time Machine, first novel by H. G. Wells, published in book form in The novel is considered one of the earliest works of science fiction and the. A seminal and hugely imaginative work of early science fiction, H.G. Wells's The Time Machine is the first and greatest modern portrayal of.

To view it, click here. He's essentially given up on his thesis and works as an assistant to Professor Marsh, and his girlfriend Kara has just dumped him.

Having constructed a calibrating machine for the professor's work, Matt hits the "reset" button and watches it blink out of existence, only to return before anyone but him notices. The second time he presses it, it disappears for ten seconds. Kidnapping the machine, he takes it home and pursues It's and Matt Fuller is a postgrad student in chronophysics at MIT.

Kidnapping the machine, he takes it home and pursues some experiments, figuring out that the machine time travels - first it was one second, then 10, then and then seconds. By the time he gets up to three days, he's attached a turtle and a camera to it and tries again. This time the metal machine has shifted off its wooden base, as well.

The camera shows nothing but some grey static for a short time, and the turtle hasn't been gone long enough, in its own time reference, to need water, food or sleep.

The clock he had attached shows it was gone for only a minute. Matt calculates that the next time jump will be for 39 days and a bigger distance, and decides to go with it.

He needs a metal cage, and borrows an old Ford from his drug-dealer friend Denny. Reappearing a minute later, in his own time, to create a traffic accident, Matt's arrested for the murder of Denny, who died when he saw the car vanish in front of his drug-addled eyes. When his million-dollar bail is paid by someone who looks like him and who sends him a message, Get in the car and go!

The only thing he can do is keep moving forward in time. This book has plenty of promise, but is disappointingly flat. Wells 's The Time Machine was required reading in high school for most when I was in 9th grade about 25 years ago , and one of my teachers chose this book as 1 of 10 books we read that year in an English literature comparative analysis course. Each month, we'd read a book and watch two film adaptations, then have discussions and write a paper. At the time, I thought, this book is a little cheesy I mean, not that I was a huge Star Trek fan although I did love me some Voyager , but even I know time machines were a lot cooler than what I saw in the movie and read about in the book.

And that's when you realize what a priceless book this was. It was the advent of a new genre's blossoming into fandom. And I became fascinated with these types of stories.

But there was so much more to it than time travel. It's a commentary on society and values. Are you ostracized when you think differently? What if you look different Do you know what a Morlock is? Check it out thanks the original GIF source in link! What I loved about this story was the thoughts and ideas of an s man writing about the potential for traveling to the past and the future, suggesting what happens to humankind over time.

In the era of Charles Darwin and the Origin of Species, or perhaps a few decades later, this book covers those ideas and helps activate a reader's imagination outside their own limited world.

It was the s That said, it's the words and imagery that catch you in this book. You have to forego current life and pretend you were still back in time. The Time Machine, H. Wells The Time Machine is a science fiction novella by H. Wells, published in and written as a frame narrative. The work is generally credited with the popularization of the concept of time travel by using a vehicle that allows an operator to travel purposely and selectively forwards or backwards in time.

The term "time machine", coined by Wells, is now almost universally used to refer to such a vehicle. Jan 28, Leonard Gaya rated it it was amazing Shelves: Reading this book has been an eye-opener and is far from what I expected or had in mind.

It is chiefly a speculation on the far future of humanity and the evolution of the industrial civilisation. It starts as an almost casual chat by the fireside about the possibility of travelling through the fourth dimension and the invention of a machine, oddly described much like an ordinary bicycle, that can g Reading this book has been an eye-opener and is far from what I expected or had in mind.

It starts as an almost casual chat by the fireside about the possibility of travelling through the fourth dimension and the invention of a machine, oddly described much like an ordinary bicycle, that can go through time. The "Time Traveller" he is never named then pays a visit to the human race of the year , and discovers what, at first, looks like a utopia: But as the night comes, a disturbing reality soon replaces this vision The end of the story is an unsettling flight to the most remote and crepuscular future of the Earth.

Finally, the Time Traveller disappears leaving but a few flowers on his desk. This novella some 60 pages is a seminal work of the science-fiction genre.

It remains to this day a landmark that has influenced almost all the utopian or dystopian writers, from Olaf Stapledon's Last and First Men to Michel Faber's Under the Skin. For the record: Wells in Against the Day , which I am reading in parallel. I am using the H. Wells collection, and the next stop is: The Island of Dr Moreau.

Watched the film remake, directed by Simon Wells one of the author's descendants. This is a somewhat faithful adaptation of the book, yet a quite average movie overall. Most scenes are imitations of Indiana Jones 's tropes: The Morlock are quite ridiculous — around the same time, Peter Jackson included Orcs into his Fellowship of the Ring that were way more convincing.

The machine itself, designed like a sort of lighthouse lamp, and the time-lapse sequences are the only unexpected and exciting elements of this film. View all 12 comments. Jun 14, Evgeny rated it really liked it Shelves: A group read with a bunch of Pantaloonless Buddies. I have yet to see any decent movie adaptation of this science fiction classic, let alone a good one. The only reason I give a plot synopsis of this otherwise well-known story is that I am afraid some people would judge it by a very lame movie.

This is the granddaddy of practically all time-travelling stories, including very new and popular sub-genre: An inventor built a time machine. He used it to travel to a distant f A group read with a bunch of Pantaloonless Buddies. He used it to travel to a distant future: You would not think I am able to write a review for this book without at least giving a nod to Back to the Future, would you?

What he found in the future can be only described as one of the first dystopia in literature. It did not look like one at the first glance, so the main hero had to survive some dangerous situations to finally get the whole picture it was not pretty.

I am also not going to bet it would not come to be in real life. When I first read a book in my early teens I thought the theoretical explanation of time travelling in the beginning was boring. This time I really liked it as it did have some solid math background underneath its simplistic facade. The adventure part was still as exciting as during my first read.

I also found the descriptions of dying Earth under dying Sun excellent, fascinating, and depressing in sense that they do mess up with you mind. Somehow I managed to miss very profound last sentence of the story during my first read. The only reason I did not give 5 stars to this book was somewhat heavy writing style at times which speaking honestly have not lowered my enjoyment by much. View all 25 comments. Feb 25, Justin rated it liked it. The Time Machine is like going to Jimmy John's to get a sandwich because the bread is just amazing.

It's so much better than any other sandwich chain out there, and I'm convinced they are using some form of illegal addictive substance in the baking process that keeps me coming back for more. The Time Machine is like that, but you only get turkey on your sandwich.

The Time Machine by H. G. Wells

No cheese or mayo or lettuce or tomato. Just turkey. The bread is still amazing though.

Just like the beginning and the ending of The The Time Machine is like going to Jimmy John's to get a sandwich because the bread is just amazing. Just like the beginning and the ending of The Time Machine. I loved how the books starts with the time traveler guy just hanging out with a bunch of dudes smoking away on cigars and drinking brandy. No one has a real name. They're just all hanging out, and the guy is telling them this crazy story about how he travelled in this machine way out into the future.

It all seems so ridiculous and everyone is all skeptical. But the guy keeps going. And his story isn't really all that exciting after all. It's like that one friend you have that tells you a story they think is the best story in the history of stories, and they give you every little detail of the story so you're all bored to death listening to this stupid thing until your friend finally gets to the end of the story which is actually really good, but, hot diggity, you didn't need to hear every mundane detail leading up to the good stuff.

That's how this book was for me which was kind of a bummer because it was about time travel. It started and ended strong, but I just felt kinda bored in the middle when the guy is just wandering around with the future creature things. I can appreciate all this did for the science fiction genre and time travel and whatnot, but I was a little underwhelmed. Three stars for the delicious bread, but I needed more condiments on my sandwich to give it a little more flavor.

Jimmy John's FTW. I'm now gonna time travel into the future by sleeping. No machine needed. See you tomorrow. View all 15 comments. Dec 14, Lou rated it it was amazing Shelves: If there was one single reason to read this it would be that H.

G Wells was a favoured author and an inspiration to the Legendary writer Ray Bradbury. Pictured below in a time machine movie prop. The Time Machine If there was one single reason to read this it would be that H. The Time Machine he speaks of was made in the year but something even greater is in my possession much smaller and highly efficient the 'iFuture' watch is now the tool of Time travel it will revolutionize the whole time travel experience I have just finished the prototype and tested it.

Infact I only wish Wells could tell of the year of the year of the undead, Zombies tread upon the earth society in mayhem and only few survivors to walk upon the land. I had indeed a purpose there and brought in time with me the virus to end the undead pandemic. Time Travel is indeed mans greatest invention and in the wrong hands mans worst nightmare and in the right hands a shining light of glory from darkness.

This story is a grand work written in wonderful prose that has a deep thought provoking effectiveness on the reader. The vision of the future is indeed frightening especially his account of the end of life on earth. H G Wells is a writer of high intelligence, a grand thinker. Time Travel is an entertaining genre to write about, the success of the Review also here and Movie adaptation trailer How will the Earth look like , years in the future? That's a question everyone can only attempt to find an answer to, while H.

Wells was one of the first writers who tackled the topic of time-travelling and painted a rather convincing picture of the future. Published in , the book introduces a scientist who uses a Time Machine to be transferred into the age of a slowly dying earth. Humans have been separated by time, genetics, wars and change of their habitats into two different races How will the Earth look like , years in the future?

Humans have been separated by time, genetics, wars and change of their habitats into two different races, the Eloi and the subterranean Morlocks.

At only about pages, Wells manages to delve into a lot of different topics, among which can be found the ambiguity of human natures, the mutual effects of humans on our planet and our planet on humans, as well as a profound look into what defines humanity itself. As a dystopian story, this tale has probably been rather ground-breaking back when it was published, and some might even consider it to be the father of all time-travel romance stories. Unlike more recent publications, however, Wells doesn't lose the point of his story in describing romantic affairs and dramatic love stories, but rather delivers a fast-paced narration coated with a prose not unlike most other writing styles from the Victorian era.

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Since the author builds up his story from some scientific background the inclusion of which I highly appreciated because Wells didn't leave things unexplained , it is not easy to get into it, but once the narrative gains speed, you will digest this book in the course of a few hours. For me, the engaging writing and the adventurous atmosphere contributed a huge part to my enjoyment of the novella.

His descriptions of the dying earth were fascinating and very memorable, as was the ending which surprised and depressed me simultaneously. Much has already been said about Wells' book and its contents, so I will conclude my review by saying that readers who are not afraid to read important dystopian classics should give this one a try.

View all 26 comments. May 31, Jeff rated it really liked it Shelves: If you go by H. Wells novella, society at least in merry future England circa , AD will have been split between the Eloi and Morlocks in a bizarre twist on the haves and have nots. Wells future is filtered from the political science theories of his day. What gave me goosebumps was when the Time Traveler left Morlockville and ended up in the waning days of Earth, as the planet hurtled into the abyss.

It would be mind-blowing. This is far scarier than ducking a bunch of cannibalistic white monkeys. Just laser-tag those Magoo bitches. View all 29 comments. Sorprendentemente, descubren que tarda en llegar y lo ven aparecer con su ropa hecha jirones, sin calzado, lastimado y hambriento. Muchos lo ven como irrealizable. La ciencia puede avanzar a pasos exponenciales, pero el ser humano en su esencia no cambia y puede torcer su destino hacia el mal en vez del bien.

Tal vez, no al extremo de "" o "Fahrenheit ", pero encierra la idea del futuro no deseado. Como tal, designa un tipo de mundo imaginario, recreado en la literatura o el cine, que se considera indeseable. View all 5 comments. And Then View all 11 comments. Aug 06, Adrian rated it really liked it Shelves: Over the last few weeks I have been going through the books that I read in my early days of joining GR and where I didn't write a proper review I am trying to remedy that situation.

I think I first read this book some time around the early to mid 70s, in fact it was probably not long after I first saw the film. Similar to WotW it was one of the s actually B movies that fuelled my desire for science fiction.

Well that and the "Supermarionation" series on TV written and produced by Ger Over the last few weeks I have been going through the books that I read in my early days of joining GR and where I didn't write a proper review I am trying to remedy that situation. Anyway having got off of the subject quite considerably lets return to this book.

For a book written in the late Victorian era this book is amazingly modern. It deals primarily with a genius inventor who theorises on the subject of time travel with the ultimate intention of building a machine that will allow him to move through time looking at mankind's future.

He discovers thousand years in the future that due to a major world war, mankind has separated into 2 distinct races. The waif like Eloi that live above ground in a paradise type world and the neanderthal ugly Morlocks who live below ground with their evil sinister ways. I think the thing that gets me most about this book is just how much imagination HG Wells must have had to write it. As i said it was written over years ago, so not as technically biased as some of today's sf but still truly awe inspiring and bearing that in mind, certainly worth a read.

Feb 01, Carmen rated it really liked it Shelves: I had slept and the bitterness of death came over my soul. Wells is such a good writer. Not only does he have an amazing imagination that carries him to impossible places, but he is very skilled at writing.

The descriptions in this book are absolutely stunning. The book deals with a British, upper-class white man who has invented a time machine telling all his cronies about it in the smoking-room. He has traveled to the year , and you have to admi "In a moment I knew what had happened. He has traveled to the year , and you have to admire Wells for not making the classic mistake of setting the future too close to the present.

I'm certain this story will have impact for millenia to come due to his far-reaching decision. In the year , there are the kind, playful, gentle child-like people who live on the surface of the planet: The Time Traveller goes on and on and on about how humanity is going to kill itself by becoming "too safe" and "too peaceful" Who has taken it and why?

Can he ever get it back? The bare thought of it was an actual physical sensation.

I could feel it grip me at the throat and stop my breathing. Apparently, the single house, and possibly event the household, had vanished. Here and there among the greenery were palace-like buildings, but the house and the cottage, which form such characteristic features of our own English landscape, had disappeared.

I could not see how things were kept going. Short, gripping, with suspense and excitement - paired with Wells exquisite writing. Here's him describing what travelling through time feels like: They are excessively unpleasant. There is a feeling exactly like that one has upon a switchback - of a helpless headlong motion! I felt the same horrible anticipation, too, of an imminent smash. As I put on pace, night followed day like the flapping of a black wing.

The dim suggestion of the laboratory seemed presently to fall away from me, and I saw the sun hopping swiftly across the sky, leaping it every minute, and every minute marking a day. I supposed the laboratory had been destroyed, and I had come into the open air. I had a dim impression of scaffolding, but I was already going too fast to be conscious of any moving things. The slowest snail that ever crawled dashed by too fast for me. The twinkling succession of darkness and light was excessively painful to the eye.

Then, in the intermittent darknesses, I saw the moon spinning swiftly through her quarters from new to full, and had a faint glimpse of the circling stars. Presently, as I went on, still gaining velocity, the palpitation of night and day merged into one continuous greyness: It's so pretty.

My copy of this book was literally falling apart in my hands as I was reading this. Oh, well, I'm sure it's free on Kindle. Tl;dr - Not too long, full of amazing writing, this book is truly transporting.

Wells is good at building suspense and creeping you out. He also delivers on some excellent descriptive passages. If he is a little misguided on his ideas about the future, that can be forgiven. It sure is entertaining reading, and understandable why this has been a classic.

Some authors can see further into the future than the others… H. Wells could see even further than those that could see far… As a result his gloomily satirical The Time Machine is a work of a prophet. Nature never appeals to intelligence until habit and instinct are useless.

There is no intelligence where there is no change and no need of change. Only those animals partake of intelligence that have a huge variety of needs and dangers.

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The future is now… Morlocks produce commodities… Eloi produce p Some authors can see further into the future than the others… H. The future is now… Morlocks produce commodities… Eloi produce pop culture… Morlocks consume pop culture… Eloi consume commodities… Politicians consume both Morlocks and Eloi… View all 3 comments.

Aug 31, Jason Koivu rated it liked it. Still thrills to this day! Yes, it's dated and compared to other sci-fi it will look like child's play, but there's a genuinely creepy moment or two within The Time Machine. And by now, reading this is sort of like reading a sci-fi history book! A Victorian-era scientist reveals that he has created a time machine and goes on to relate his harrowing adventures into the future, where he meets a race apparently so advanced they've stop doing anything, as well as a monster race of subterranean dwelle Still thrills to this day!

A Victorian-era scientist reveals that he has created a time machine and goes on to relate his harrowing adventures into the future, where he meets a race apparently so advanced they've stop doing anything, as well as a monster race of subterranean dwellers with a peculiar connection to the others.

Eloi and Morlock, together imperfect harmony Wells created a cautionary tale for an ever-evolving scientific world. Yes, even in the Victorian area it was apparent which way the human race was headed.

It's that easy living life-style that we've strived for since the earliest invention. It can be taken too far, says Wells. Granted, he doesn't think that will happen for another , years, so until then I say, smoke 'em if ya got 'em! But I have to say I was pleasantly surprised by it. It follows that classic 'unnamed narrator recounting story 3.

It follows that classic 'unnamed narrator recounting story of other unnamed character' structure, even with a bit of story within a story a la Frankenstein. Clearly H.

The Accidental Time Machine

Wells had an agenda behind this book, as it seems to be a response to Britain's cultural and economic situation in the late 19th century.

Nevertheless, it was a fun and entertaining read, and the audiobook--narrated by Sir Derek Jacobi--was excellent. View 1 comment. Aug 09, Becky rated it it was ok Shelves: I don't think there's any disputing that H.

Wells was a genius and that his work was brilliant back in the day. But I just don't think that it ages all that well. Or maybe society has begun its long and inevitable evolution into the indolent beings Wells' time traveler claims that we become in roughly , years, and we don't want to think too hard about a narrative that takes some time to get to the point.

Probably at some point between the Victorian era when this was written and the So Probably at some point between the Victorian era when this was written and the year eight hundred thousand whatever, we will have started beaming storypictures directly into our brains and thus have no need for narrative any longer.

They say that a picture is worth a thousand words, and Wells was determined to use as many of them as possible. And so it is with maybe a tiny twinge of regret that I have to give this only 2 stars, because the narrative is where this book lost me.

It was sooooooooooooooooo long and drawn out, with so many descriptions and so many needless details that my advanced future brain just wandered off in search of shiny things.

I think the premise here is pretty cool, but the actual story didn't do much for me Usually, at least in my experience, time travelers usually go BACK in time. Either to change something, or learn something, or just accidentally.

This one went forward in time. Because he could, I guess. He wanted to see where humanity ends up?

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I don't know. So, we find that in the year eight hundred thousand whatever that humanity has evolved along two different lines. An upper class set of Eloi, who are so advanced that they And the Morlocks, who have moved underground and adapted to a mole-like lifestyle. Until they ran out of food, anyway. But, I have a coupla problems with this book. For one, I don't think that that kind of evolution would happen in less than a million years, considering how long it's taken for humans to develop from pre-human primates to where we are now.

The time machine only moved through time. It stayed in the exact place it started, geographically, until it was moved by someone else. But, Earth is moving through space. Our solar system is moving through space. Our galaxy is moving through space. Everything is moving through space. If you were to jump in the air and skip a minute of time, where you land will not be where you started. It might not be far off, because it's only a minute, but it will be off.

And if you were to travel eight hundred thousand whatever years in the future, the earth is no longer going to be in the same location in space. When Mr. Time Traveler came back, as he had to do to tell his tale, and his time machine was moved several feet or yards or whatever away, I thought to myself, "OK so we're ignoring the moving through space thing What a shame it would have been to arrive back home and end up trapped in the wall because the machine was moved one foot too far to the left.

Third, I just don't see the Morlocks as scary or disgusting or, well, anything but pitiable. They evolved along a different line, or so Mr. Time Traveler theorizes, and that made them less pretty, and thus lower class citizens relegated to the sewers and given the upper class's scraps - which only further helped along their evolutionary distancing, if we go along with dude's theory.

They become less human, and more primitive, and do what they need to do to survive, as ALL life does. But with attitudes like Mr. Time Traveler's, is it any wonder they became what they did? It's like Frankenstein's monster all over again. We create things we don't understand and then throw them away when they aren't pleasant.

I bet this was scary shit when it was written, but now? I just feel sorry for the Morlocks and think that the Eloi and Mr. Time Traveler are a bunch of dicks. Boring ones, at that.BBC News. Happy reading! Want to Read Currently Reading Read. They appear happy and carefree, but fear the dark and in particular fear moonless nights. By signing up, I confirm that I'm over Wells had an agenda behind this book, as it seems to be a response to Britain's cultural and economic situation in the late 19th century.

Did his apparent objectivity provide an additional sense of credibility to the text? Just like the beginning and the ending of The Time Machine. The dim suggestion of the laboratory seemed presently to fall away from me, and I saw the sun hopping swiftly across the sky, leaping it every minute, and every minute marking a day.

A reading of the script, however, suggests that this teleplay remained fairly faithful to the book.